Entries by admin

5 Web Design Trends and Ideas for 2021

Original Source: https://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2021/02/5-web-design-trends-and-ideas-for-2021/

One of the few bright spots in 2020 has been the creativity companies and individuals alike have exhibited in dealing with what, at times, seemed to be overwhelming problems.

The world of web design was no different. Designers and agencies had to adapt and implement new color schemes or design new shopping experiences, which made some of the previous design trends not fit for the current design problems.

We’ll take a look at these newest design trends and the rationale behind them. As we do so, we’ll also take a look at some of BeTheme’s 600+ pre-built sites that have already put them to good use.

1. Comforting Color Palettes Lighten the Load

In years past, bolder color schemes were one of the hallmarks of web design trends. Their purpose was to quickly engage a visitor and prompt him or her to respond emotionally.

Given all the drama and turmoil we were subjected to through most of 2020, we’ve come to welcome the use of toned-down colors in marketing instead of the bolder, brasher, and more “in-your-face” color schemes. 

Bellroy’s website puts toned-down colors to good use. This company’s product line of wallets, bags, and the like, are designed to keep people’s belongings organized, safe, and secure. A wild color scheme simply wouldn’t be fitting.

How, then, are brightly-colored products dealt with? Thanks to judicious uses of white space and background photos, this website still emphasizes a toned-down color palette.

The BeSpa pre-built website is another example of a color scheme that almost immediately puts the mind at ease.

Calm and soothing? Yes.

Boring? Definitely not.

Comfort and security are the emotional drivers in this example.

2. Seamlessly Intermingle and Balance Physical and Digital Imagery

People confined to their homes because of Covid-based restrictions spent many more hours looking at their screens in 2020. Online programming began to take on the appearance of a reality show that blurred the boundaries between the real and the digital.

Whereas web designers tended in the past to rely on either photos or illustrations in their designs, these same designers have started to integrate these blurring effects into their designs, with results that range from amusing and quirky to highly informative.

Check out this example from fashion designer Constance Burke: 

It’s not every day you see real models wearing hand-drawn fashion sketches. But it’s just one example of how the physical can be blended with the digital.

The BeSki pre-built site does the same blending of the two, but in a totally different way:

The sections’ designs switch from predominantly physical to largely digital and back again, an excellent approach that provides a maximum amount of useful information.

It’s also worth noting how snowbanks are effectively used to seamlessly transition from one section to the next.

3. Create Well-Organized and Helpful Shopping Experiences

More people spending more time at home has created a surge in online shopping. As a result, many online store owners are now feeling the effects of increased competition.

Consumers look for brands they believe they can trust. At the same time, they want their online shopping experiences to be as quick and painless as possible. They look for (and expect) quick and effective product search capabilities, helpful and effective product displays, one-page product descriptions, and the like.

Walgreen’s product page design is especially well-suited for 2021 ecommerce shoppers: 

Everything shoppers usually need to know is presented above-the-fold. They can easily proceed to the next step or scroll down for reviews or additional product specifications. 

BePestControl’s pre-built website uses a similar product design approach: 

In this example, the main selling points are up-front and are kept short and sweet. The shopper can either hit the ‘Add to Cart’ button or look below the button for additional information.

In both examples, a visitor doesn’t have to mull over what step to take next since one of the design objectives is to make the shopping experience as easy and as satisfying as possible.

4. Take Advantage of the Benefits of User-Controlled Video Content

Once upon a time, video content was “the thing” to incorporate in a website. Hero background videos proved to be particularly engaging, and “how-to” videos presented much more useful information than illustrations or blocks of text could.

On the other hand, Auto-play videos, those that started on their own, all too often had a tendency to irritate rather than inform, especially when their content didn’t address a visitor’s immediate concern.

Thanks to Zoom and similar video platforms that came into widespread use in 2020 and to website designs that include video “Play” buttons, users have become much more comfortable with the medium. As an example, Shoppers have been given total control over if or when they want to view a given video. 

This is the design approach Payoneer has taken: 

The white “Pay” button is impossible to miss, and while it is designed to encourage a visitor to watch a testimonial, doing so is completely optional.

The BeOptics pre-built website cleverly slips in a video play option as well: 

In this example, when visitors hover over the “See More” button, it lets them know that they have the option to watch the video if they want to learn more.

5. Trust Builders Should be Non-Negotiable Web Design Elements

There are various ways in which products are organized or showcased in brick and mortar businesses to instill trust. Helpful and friendly staff also contribute to instilling trust.

Some of these trust-builders are easily incorporated into eCommerce designs. Others, though more difficult to fit in, can usually be satisfactorily addressed.

Digital trust builders can include.

Logos (familiar, whimsical, innovative, engaging)
Portfolios and/or product pages
Customer reviews, product ratings, and client testimonials
Case studies and product or price comparisons
Safety and security seals, e.g., Better Business Bureau, PayPal checkout
Charts, graphs, counters, and other data visualization techniques
Proof of social, charitable, or community-related actions and contributions

Put, trust-building content will beat hard-sell techniques every time, especially if you would like your customer base to include referred and repeat customers.

Omaze, for example, gives people entries for prizes based on their donations while at the same time highlighting the good things it and its donors have brought about.

To help build trust, the site devotes space to highlighting publications that have featured Omaze and the work it has done and is doing.

Plus, it puts data visualization and non-profit testimonials into play to give visitors an added insight into what is going on behind the scenes: 

As you can see, it doesn’t have to be difficult to incorporate genuine trust-building content into your website designs.

BePortfolio is a great example of how you might go about doing this for a portfolio site, whether it’s your own or a site for a client:

The home page alone has plenty of space for including trust-building content:

A satisfied customer counter
Product usage case studies and testimonial
Portfolio highlights
Client and partnership logos

And it can only get better as a visitor moves through the site, but only if you’ve chosen to make that happen.

Have You Started to Take These New Web Design Trends to Heart?

We’re not suggesting that you throw the baby out with the bathwater, but some trends will need to be discarded to enable you to adjust to a new normal. Other 2020 design trends, like minimalism and headline topography, are likely to remain popular for years to come.

New trends that incorporate calming color palettes, image blending, more efficient eCommerce UX designs, user-controlled video, and trust-building elements should give your customers the feeling of comfort and security they will be seeking in 2021.

If you want to implement some or all of these new trends in your 2021 website designs, BeTheme’s 600+ pre-built sites make doing so an easy task.

 

[– This is a sponsored post on behalf of BeTheme –]

Source

p img {display:inline-block; margin-right:10px;}
.alignleft {float:left;}
p.showcase {clear:both;}
body#browserfriendly p, body#podcast p, div#emailbody p{margin:0;}

The post 5 Web Design Trends and Ideas for 2021 first appeared on Webdesigner Depot.

Collective #647

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/tympanus/~3/tIsYncpnJWs/

Collective 647 Item Image

Inspirational Website of the Week: CCNCN – Saison 2021

A fresh design with great typography and a daring, addicting click interaction concept. Our pick this week.

Get inspired

Collective 647 Item Image

Our Sponsor
Blockchain domains are owned, not rented

Blockchain domains are stored by their owners in their wallet like a cryptocurrency, no third party can take them away. Pay once and you own the domain for life, no renewal fees. Get your .crypto or .zil domain now.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

Creative Good: Why I’m losing faith in UX

Read why Mark Hurst thinks that UX is now “user exploitation”.

Read it

Collective 647 Item Image

New aspect-ratio CSS property supported in Chromium, Safari Technology Preview, and Firefox Nightly

Maintaining aspect ratio within images and elements is now easier to achieve with the new aspect-ratio CSS property.

Read it

Collective 647 Item Image

Things You Can Do With CSS Today

Andy Bell looks into masonry layout, :is selector, clamp(), ch and ex units, updated text decoration, and a few other useful CSS properties.

Read it

Collective 647 Item Image

We Value Your Privacy (At About $0.50): Dark Patterns in UI Copy 2021

Read how shady euphemisms are employed to trick users into handing over personal data, and manipulative descriptions continue to deceive people. By Graeme Fulton.

Read it

Collective 647 Item Image

SVG Waves

A handy SVG wave generator made by Bereket Semagn.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

Mutsuacen

A great little tool to create animated and interactive drawings.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

Fusuma

A tool to create slides from Markdown.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

Crunk dancer

An amazing music web experiment by Arno Di Nunzio. Made with Three.js and Cannon.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

Faking container queries with CSS Grid

With CSS Grid and some trickery it’s possible to implement something very close to container queries.

Read it

Collective 647 Item Image

Le Voyage Azarien

A beautiful immersive journey into a forest made by Joseph Azar.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

Making GitHub’s new homepage fast and performant

The third article in a five-part series on building GitHub’s new homepage.

Read it

Collective 647 Item Image

Iconduck

Iconduck lists over 100,000 free open source icons, illustrations and graphics from around the web. They can be used for personal and commercial projects.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

CSS Polygon Shapes

Tweakable shapes generated with css-doodle and clip-path. By Yuan Chuan.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

ReacType

If you didn’t know about it yet: ReacType is an open-source application that assists developers in prototyping React applications via a user-friendly drag-and-drop interface.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

Supercons

A friendly open source React iconset by Lachlan Campbell.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

How-to: Use the tabindex attribute

Learn why and how to use the tabindex attribute in this article by Eric Bailey.

Read it

Collective 647 Item Image

Continuous Typography Tester

A prototype of a design tool for continuous typography made by Max Kohler. Read more about it here.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

Don’t use functions as callbacks unless they’re designed for it

Jake Archibald shows why functions shouldn’t be used as callbacks unless they are designed for it.

Read it

Collective 647 Item Image

GutenSearch

Find any term in the wast body of Project Gutenberg books.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

Gaze-controlled keyboard

Write words using your eye movements. Built with Tensorflow.js

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

Skateboard Video Platform

A beautiful UI coded by Aysenur Turk.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

Droste Creator

Create recursive images with the droste effect using this cool tool. Made by Javier Bórquez.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

Barebones CSS for Fluid Images

Zach Leatherman’s CSS tip for fluid images.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

Svelte Kit, the first ‘serverless-first’ framework?

Jasper Moelker tested out Svelte Kit and summarized what he learned.

Read it

Collective 647 Item Image

Introducing Pika. A free, open-source colour picker app

Learn about Pika, an easy to use, open-source, native colour picker for macOS.

Read it

Collective 647 Item Image

From Our Blog
How to Code the Traveling Particles Animation from “Volt for Drive”

A coding session where you’ll learn how to implement Volt for Drive’s traveling particles animation with Three.js.

Check it out

Collective 647 Item Image

From Our Blog
Rotating Loading Animation of 3D Shapes with Three.js

Check it out

The post Collective #647 appeared first on Codrops.

Is Twitter Rebrand a Glimpse at the Future of Design?

Original Source: https://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2021/02/is-twitter-rebrand-a-glimpse-at-the-future-of-design/

The CMO at Twitter, Leslie Berland, has announced a substantial rebrand intended to reflect the experience of using the site. The move was announced on the platform first and later confirmed on its blog.

Twitter hopes the visual identity will “fully reflect the complexity, fluidity, and power of the conversations today.”

The instantly recognizable bird logomark stays, as does the inoffensive tech-blue. But everything else has been grunged up.

rather than build the system up from each component part or build around a specific element, we embarked upon building a creative design system that’s intentionally imperfect

— Donna Lamar, Global ECD, Twitter

There’s a brand new custom typeface named “Chirp” designed in collaboration with Grilli Type. It mixes features of gothics and grotesques with hipster-friendly quirks and replaces the decidedly corporate Helvetica.

The most visually arresting elements are the print-inspired collages, faux-print effects, and distress marks. It’s a move away from the safe, minimal style that has dominated the design industry for more than a decade.

There are layers of bill posters torn off in pieces revealing text beneath, macroscopic views of people, and an all-pervading effortless cool. Think Paris, on a Sunday morning, circa 1997.

It’s exciting to see a major brand strike out in a new direction, particularly one that isn’t Google-derived. There’s plenty of energy in the new artwork, but it doesn’t escape notice that this is a surface level restyle; the core design remains.

Is this a glimpse of design over the next few years: a braver, irreverent, and decidedly less-corporate style of corporate design? Or, a misstep we’ll all forget as soon as Material Design 3.0 is released?

Source

p img {display:inline-block; margin-right:10px;}
.alignleft {float:left;}
p.showcase {clear:both;}
body#browserfriendly p, body#podcast p, div#emailbody p{margin:0;}

The post Is Twitter Rebrand a Glimpse at the Future of Design? first appeared on Webdesigner Depot.

Tips To Improve Your E-Commerce Website Design

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Designrfix/~3/mEmE-aGzG_w/tips-to-improve-your-e-commerce-website-design

Is your e-commerce web design no more interesting? Is it not earning revenues as earlier?  What does it indicate?  The time has come to improve your e-commerce website design. You need to consider what to include in your e-commerce website design so that your business stands out from the crowd.  It is a big concern […]

The post Tips To Improve Your E-Commerce Website Design appeared first on designrfix.com.

Passive Income Methods for Designers

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Designrfix/~3/5ZH-pZiLjzU/passive-income-methods-for-designers

Image source: Pixabay.com If you are a designer who is looking to increase his or her revenue, finding extra work or creating a project of your own should not be that big of a problem. It all comes down to your experience and willingness to learn new things, but you already have a big advantage […]

The post Passive Income Methods for Designers appeared first on designrfix.com.

Things You Can Do With CSS Today

Original Source: https://smashingmagazine.com/2021/02/things-you-can-do-with-css-today/

CSS is great and getting better all the time. Over recent years, especially, it has evolved really fast, too. Understandably, some of the really handy powers CSS gives you might have slipped you by because of this, so in this article, I’m going to show you some really handy stuff you can do with modern CSS today, and also share some stuff that we can look forward to in the future.

Let’s dig in.

Masonry Layout

Masonry layouts became very popular with Pinterest, Tumblr and Unsplash, and up until recently, we tended to rely on JavaScript to assist with our layout, which is almost never a good idea.

Sure, you can use CSS multicol pretty darn effectively to achieve a masonry layout, but that approach can be problematic with tabbed-focus as it lays content out in columns. This creates a disconnect between the visual layout and the tabbing index.

Fast forward to today (well, very shortly in the future) and a masonry layout is pretty trivial, thanks to an update to CSS Grid. Here’s a complete masonry layout, with gutters, in 6 lines of CSS:

.masonry {
display: grid;
grid-template-columns: repeat(4, 1fr);
grid-template-rows: masonry;
grid-gap: 1rem;
}

The magic is in grid-template-rows set as masonry, which turns it into the “masonry axis”, thus providing the “filled in” layout we’ve all come accustomed to.

Let’s expand on this and explore a quick demo of creating a responsive masonry layout. Using a slightly modified version of the above CSS, we can replace the grid-template-columns line to use this auto grid method instead:

.masonry {
display: grid;
grid-template-columns: repeat(auto-fill, minmax(16rem, 1fr));
grid-template-rows: masonry;
grid-gap: 1rem;
}

The minmax() function allows us to define what the smallest size is for our items, which for us, is 16rem. Then we tell minmax() what the maximum size should be for each item. We declare that as 1fr, which takes 1 portion of the remaining available space.

This definition of grid-template-columns allows our layout to break and stack if it runs out of horizontal space which the masonry axis then automatically sorts our remaining elements for us.

Note: Right now, masonry is only working in Firefox Nightly, or behind a flag, but the grid layout will still work perfectly in non-supporting browsers, making it a decent progressive enhancement target.

You can also read this great article, too.

Resources

Content-visibility on web.dev
Another video explaining what happens under the hood
A handy article with some useful notes to know about content-visibility

Wrapping Up And What’s Coming Up

That’s a pretty cool new CSS, right? There’s loads more arriving soon and loads in the long-term pipeline too. We can look forward to Media Queries Level 5 which let us target the current ambient light level and whether or not the user prefers reduced data.

We’ve also got CSS Nesting in draft, which will give us Sass-like nesting capabilities like this:

.my-element {
background: red;

& p {
background: yellow;
}
}

We’re getting even more control too, with font metrics override descriptors and Cascade Level 5, which introduces layers to the cascade. Prototyping is happening with container queries too!

Lastly, there are some cool new tricks on the horizon, like scroll-linked animations, which will open the door wide-open to a new generation of creative work on the web.

In conclusion, the present and future of CSS are very bright indeed and if you take a pragmatic, progressive approach to your CSS: things will continue to get better and better on your projects too.