Awesome Gifts For The Geek Fashionistas

Original Source: https://www.hongkiat.com/blog/awesome-christmas-gifts-for-the-geek-fashionista-in-your-life/

With the holiday season and Christmas coming up, we thought it would be cool to celebrate the geek fashionistas in our lives. All of us know one geek chick that totally rocks. Often finding a gift…

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Deal: The Preposterously Huge Book of Google Font Combinations

Original Source: https://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2020/12/deal-the-preposterously-huge-book-of-google-font-combinations/

Google Fonts is one of the most useful tools designers have, with hundreds of amazing fonts provided for free. But if you just grab one of the top ten suggestions, you’re missing out on a vast wealth of typographic gems.

Just about every font on Google Fonts is worth trying out, but the very best designs — designs that engage, inspire, and delight — combine two or more fonts. It’s the same principle as sweet and sour; two competing tastes that are both familiar and surprising; that’s a good font combination.

But how do you pick out those flavors? How do you know what complements and what clashes? Does Inter work okay with Open Sans? Does Merriweather look good with Roboto?

Well, today we’ve got a deal for you that will answer those questions and more. Our sister site, MightDeals.com, has arranged an extraordinary discount on The Preposterously Huge Book of Google Font Combinations. To date, it’s the single largest collection of Google font combinations ever produced.

Read on to find out how the PHBGFC will save you time, update your design choices, and keep you inspired throughout 2021 and beyond…

What’s Preposterous About the PHBGFC?

The Preposterously Huge Book of Google Font Combinations is almost 8,000 pages long. If you use one of the suggested font combinations every week, it will take you 125 years to exhaust it.

We think you’ll agree that that’s a truly preposterous number of design options.

What Exactly is the PHBGFC?

When you visit Google Fonts, you see a nice clean interface, with some dropdowns. You can pick a font. And then maybe pick another. But there’s no real way of discovering, trying out or otherwise selecting font combinations.

The Preposterously Huge Book of Google Font Combinations changes that by lining up all the possible combinations in an easy-to-browse package.

Step 1: Navigate to the index at the front of the book.

Step 2: Locate a font you’re interested in, in the index.

Step 3: Click the font name to navigate to the corresponding page in the book.

Step 4: Scroll back and forth through the pages to review the possible combinations for your font.

It’s that easy!

The Preposterously Huge Book of Google Font Combinations lays out all the best Google Font combinations for you — every font included has a regular, bold, italic, and bold italic version — saving you days of hunting through the site hoping to hit upon a combination that works.

What If I Don’t Like the Suggestions?

The Preposterously Huge Book of Google Font Combinations isn’t a set of rules or guidelines; it’s a tool to help you make the best design decisions you can make in the shortest possible time.

The Preposterously Huge Book of Google Font Combinations purposefully doesn’t exclude any combinations — even ugly combinations are deliberately included — so you’re free to compare an unredacted list of font options.

Every design decision you take is yours, but instead of spending hours downloading, installing, and comparing prospective fonts, you can review a combination in seconds.

Who Should Use the PHBGFC?

The Preposterously Huge Book of Google Font Combinations is an essential purchase for anyone working with Google Fonts. It will save you time and improve your familiarity with one of the web’s best resources.

If you like fonts, then you’re going to enjoy just scrolling through the Preposterously Huge Book of Google Font Combinations. It’s a beautifully realized catalog of font options.

Whether you’re a design student, a web developer curious about design, or a seasoned design professional, The Preposterously Huge Book of Google Font Combinations won’t just save you time; it will help develop your eye for great font combinations.

Grab The Preposterously Huge Book of Google Font Combinations Today!

This incredible resource, designed to help you maximize your use of Google Fonts, will save you hours of fruitless hunting through Google’s UI.

The Preposterously Huge Book of Google Font Combinations normally sells for $69, but thanks to our sister-site MightyDeals.com, WebDesignerDepot readers can grab it for just $24! That’s a suitably preposterous 65% off the full retail price.

Head over to MightyDeals today to download your copy of The Preposterously Huge Book of Google Font Combinations and start making Google Fonts work for you.

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Create an iOS app for your product without coding

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Designrfix/~3/pVA4dM-RvKE/create-an-ios-app-for-your-product-without-coding

A few years ago, building an app for your product would’ve meant relentless research to find the right software development company, hefty down payments, months spent in specification and wireframes, and another lifetime till you finally got the ready app in your hand. This process would be so overwhelming for businesses that in a majority […]

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A Short Guide to Help You Conduct User Research

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Designrfix/~3/pQlDNQD_E6o/a-short-guide-to-help-you-conduct-user-research

User research has become a significant part of every designing process. It was long overlooked by many UX designers and their clients in the past, but many professionals have recently become aware of the benefits user research can give to their products. If you have just looked at why it is necessary, then it about […]

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UI Interactions & Animations Roundup #13

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/tympanus/~3/1A_irBGk1uE/

Lots of fantastic new animation concepts have been shared in the last couple of weeks with some shiny trends, lovely 3D effects and amazing immersive interactions.

We hope you enjoy this set and get updated with some fresh trends and ideas in UI interactions and animations.

2DOX Website Loader

by Halo Web

Luxam 3D Museum Scene

by Advanced Team

SQuarE

by Jacek Janiczak

Wine + Peace™ · Manifesto and Footer Homepage

by Pierre-Jean Doumenjou

Doonbeg—Golf Club

by Hrvoje Grubisic

Burger Menu animation

by Givi Dautashvili

Software Developer Website Interaction

by Cuberto

3D slider concept

by Hrvoje Grubisic

Lewa House – Early Concept

by Jack Harvatt

Naba Zabih Folio

by Zhenya Rynzhuk

Default Cube PRO

by Oleg Frolov

Lewa House Concept

by Nathan Riley

Méribel – posters

by Konstantin Yakovlev

kicks editorial

by Hampus Öhman

Instagram Social Widget

by Francesco Zagami

Landing page web design & interactions for Qoorio

by Vilius Vaicius

Motion Exercise N°008

by Bastien Allard

Bento 3D Design Vol.3

by Kirill Emelyanov

E-Commerce Web Interaction – Domingo

by Daniel Tan

Clothes Brand Website Design

by tubik

CUYANA — Store

by tokitoshi

The post UI Interactions & Animations Roundup #13 appeared first on Codrops.

Collective #642

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/tympanus/~3/h2TFPtEAdoc/

Collective 642 item image

Inspirational Website of the Week: Guillaume Colombel

Slick and cool, that’s the portfolio of Guillaume Colombel, our choice this week.

Get inspired

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Hotwire

Hotwire is an alternative approach to building modern web applications with Turbo at its heart, which is a set of complementary techniques for speeding up page changes and form submissions without writing any JavaScript at all.

Check it out

Divi Layout Packs

Our Sponsor
Instant websites for your clients with Divi Layout Packs

With the Divi Layout Packs you’ll get professional designs ready to be used for your client projects.

Start building

Collective 642 item image

AnimXYZ

The first composable CSS animation toolkit that helps you create, customize, and compose animations for your website without writing a single keyframe.

Check it out

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Let’s Build a Confetti Cannon

Learn how to make a confetti cannon in this interactive tutorial by Varun Vachhar.

Read it

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Santa Cruise

Help save Christmas with this fun game where you are a gift distributing Elf. By the folks of Kffein.

Play it

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A typographer and designer’s guide to elegance

A great interview with remarkable designer Ayaka B. Ito on her work and how she crafts elegenace.

Read it

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Aysenur Turk’s UI works

UI developer Aysenur Turk has made these stunning UI designs in 2020.

Check it out

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Type Scale Clamp Generator

A nice visual type scale generator using the clamp() property.

Check it out

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3D model configurator with React Three Fiber and gltfjsx

A fantastic React Three Fiber tutorial by Yuri Artyukh.

Watch it

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Pattern Generator

A super stylish tool to create unique, seamless, royalty-free patterns. Export as SVG, JPEG, or PNG.

Check it out

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Pinecraft

Make a digital tree & share it, and Sennep will plant a real one!

Check it out

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JavaScript Christmas

In case you missed it: One of Bekk’s advent calendars with original content.

Check it out

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Conditional JavaScript

Umar Hansa shares a few techniques which you can use for selectively downloading/executing resources such as JavaScript.

Check it out

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Video: Using Tailwind with WordPress

Michelle Barker chats with Keith Devon and Mark Wilkinson of Highrise Digital, alongside Ben Furfie, about her experience of using Tailwind CSS for building WordPress sites.

Watch it

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Scale

One new high-quality, open-source illustration each day with the option to customize the primary color.

Check it out

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EPIC days

A great project by EPIC where they share illustrations of many international days.

Check it out

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Free Christmas Illustrations

A high-quality free Christmas illustration pack for Photoshop, Illustrator, Adobe XD and Sketch.

Check it out

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Everything About Callback Functions in JavaScript

In this post, Dmitri Pavlutin explains the concept of a callback function and shows how to distinguish the two types of callbacks: synchronous and asynchronous.

Read it

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Improving Cross-Browser Testing, Part 1: Web Application Testing Today

The first article in a series of posts where you’ll learn about the current web-application testing landscape and what Firefox is doing today to allow developers to run more kinds of tests.

Read it

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10 Misconceptions on UX

Castor & Pollux put together this really beautifully designed quiz with 10 common misconceptions about design interfaces.

Check it out

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Recreating a Dave Whyte Animation in React-Three-Fiber

Learn how to use instanced rendering and post-processing techniques to recreate a hypnotic looping animation with react-three-fiber.

Read it

Collective 642 item image

Inspirational Websites Roundup #21

A hand-picked collection of some really good web designs for your inspiration.

Check it out

Collective 642 item image

UI Interactions & Animations Roundup #13

A fresh set of trendy UI interactions and animations for your inspiration.

Check it out

The post Collective #642 appeared first on Codrops.

What’s Coming To VueX?

Original Source: https://smashingmagazine.com/2020/12/vuex-library/

Vuex is the solution for state management in Vue applications. The next version — Vuex 4 — is making its way through the final steps before officially releasing. This release will bring full compatibility with Vue 3, but doesn’t add new features. While Vuex has always been a powerful solution, and the first choice for many developers for state management in Vue, some developers had hoped to see more workflow issues addressed. However, even as Vuex 4 is just getting out the door, Kia King Ishii (a Vue core team member) is talking about his plans for Vuex 5, and I’m so excited by what I saw that I had to share it with you all. Note that Vuex 5 plans are not finalized, so some things may change before Vuex 5 is released, but if it ends up mostly similar to what you see in this article, it should be a big improvement to the developer experience.

With the advent of Vue 3 and it’s composition API, people have been looking into hand-built simple alternatives. For example, You Might Not Need Vuex demonstrates a relatively simple, yet flexible and robust pattern for using the composition API along with provide/inject to create shared state stores. As Gábor states in his article, though, this (and other alternatives) should only be used in smaller applications because they lack all those things that aren’t directly about the code: community support, documentation, conventions, good Nuxt integrations, and developer tools.

That last one has always been one of the biggest issues for me. The Vue devtools browser extension has always been an amazing tool for debugging and developing Vue apps, and losing the Vuex inspector with “time travel” would be a pretty big loss for debugging any non-trivial applications.

Thankfully, with Vuex 5 we’ll be able to have our cake and eat it too. It will work more like these composition API alternatives but keep all the benefits of using an official state management library. Now let’s take a look at what will be changing.

Defining A Store

Before we can do anything with a Vuex store, we need to define one. In Vuex 4, a store definition will look like this:

import { createStore } from ‘vuex’

export const counterStore = createStore({
state: {
count: 0
},

getters: {
double (state) {
return state.count * 2
}
},

mutations: {
increment (state) {
state.count++
}
},

actions: {
increment (context) {
context.commit(‘increment’)
}
}
})

Each store has four parts: state stores the data, getters give you computed state, mutations are used to mutate the state, and actions are the methods that are called from outside the store to accomplish anything related to the store. Usually, actions don’t just commit a mutation as this example shows. Instead, they are used to do asynchronous tasks because mutations must be synchronous or they just implement more complicated or multi-step functionality. Actions also cannot mutate the state on their own; they must use a mutator. So what does Vuex 5 look like?

import { defineStore } from ‘vuex’

export const counterStore = defineStore({
name: ‘counter’,

state() {
return { count: 0 }
},

getters: {
double () {
return this.count * 2
}
},

actions: {
increment () {
this.count++
}
}
})

There are a few changes to note here. First, instead of createStore, we use defineStore. This difference is negligible, but it’s there for semantic reasons, which we’ll go over later. Next, we need to provide a name for the store, which we didn’t need before. In the past, modules got their own name, but they weren’t provided by the module itself; they were just the property name they were assigned to by the parent store that added them. Now, there are no modules. Instead, each module will be a separate store and have a name. This name is used by the Vuex registry, which we’ll talk about later.

After that, we need to make state a function that returns the initial state instead of just setting it to the initial state. This is similar to the data option on components. We write getters very similar to the way we did in Vuex 4, but instead of using the state as a parameter for each getter, you can just use this to get to the state. In the same way, actions don’t need to worry about a context object being passed in: they can just use this to access everything. Finally, there are no mutations. Instead, mutations are combined with actions. Kia noted that too often, mutations just became simple setters, making them pointlessly verbose, so they removed them. He didn’t mention whether it was “ok” to mutate the state directly from outside the store, but we are definitely allowed and encouraged to mutate state directly from an action and the Flux pattern frowns on the direct mutation of state.

Note: For those who prefer the composition API over the options API for creating components, you’ll be happy to learn there is also a way to create stores in a similar fashion to using the composition API.

import { ref, computed } from ‘vue’
import { defineStore } from ‘vuex’

export const counterStore = defineStore(‘counter’, {
const count = ref(0)

const double = computed(() => count.value * 2)

function increment () {
count.value++
}

return { count, double, increment }
})

As shown above, the name gets passed in as the first argument for defineStore. The rest looks just like a composition function for components. This will yield exactly the same result as the previous example that used the options API.

Getting The Store Instantiated

In Vuex 4, things have changed from Vuex 3, but I’ll just look at v4 to keep things from getting out of hand. In v4, when you called createStore, you already instantiated it. You can then just use it in your app, either via app.use or directly:

import { createApp } from ‘vue’
import App from ‘./App.vue’ // Your root component
import store from ‘./store’ // The store definition from earlier

const app = createApp(App)

app.use(store)
app.mount(‘#app’)

// Now all your components can access it via `this.$store`
// Or you can use in composition components with `useStore()`

// ———————————————–

// Or use directly… this is generally discouraged
import store from ‘./store’

store.state.count // -> 0
store.commit(‘increment’)
store.dispatch(‘increment’)
store.getters.double // -> 4

This is one thing that Vuex 5 makes a bit more complicated than in v4. Each app now can get a separate instance of Vuex, which makes sure that each app can have separate instances of the same stores without sharing data between them. You can share an instance of Vuex if you want to share instances of stores between apps.

import { createApp } from ‘vue’
import { createVuex } from ‘vuex’
import App from ‘./App.vue’ // Your root component

const app = createApp(App)
const vuex = createVuex() // create instance of Vuex

app.use(vuex) // use the instance
app.mount(‘#app’)

Now all of your components have access to the Vuex instance. Instead of giving your store(s) definition directly, you then import them into the components you want to use them in and use the Vuex instance to instantiate and register them:

import { defineComponent } from ‘vue’
import store from ‘./store’

export default defineComponent({
name: ‘App’,

computed: {
counter () {
return this.$vuex.store(store)
}
}
})

Calling $vuex.store, instantiates and registers the store in the Vuex instance. From that point on, any time you use $vuex.store on that store, it’ll give you back the already instantiated store instead of instantiating it again. You can call the store method straight on an instance of Vuex created by createVuex().

Now your store is accessible on that component via this.counter. If you’re using the composition API for your component, you can use useStore instead of this.$vuex.store:

import { defineComponent } from ‘vue’
import { useStore } from ‘vuex’ // import useStore
import store from ‘./store’

export default defineComponent({
setup () {
const counter = useStore(store)

return { counter }
}
})

There are pros and cons to importing the store directly into the component and instantiating it there. It allows you to code split and lazily loads the store only where it’s needed, but now it’s a direct dependency instead of being injected by a parent (not to mention you need to import it every time you want to use it). If you want to use dependency injection to provide it throughout the app, especially if you know it’ll be used at the root of the app where code splitting won’t help, then you can just use provide:

import { createApp } from ‘vue’
import { createVuex } from ‘vuex’
import App from ‘./App.vue’
import store from ‘./store’

const app = createApp(App)
const vuex = createVuex()

app.use(vuex)
app.provide(‘store’, store) // provide the store to all components
app.mount(‘#app’)

And you can just inject it in any component where you’re going to use it:

import { defineComponent } from ‘vue’

export default defineComponent({
name: ‘App’,
inject: [‘store’]
})

// Or with Composition API

import { defineComponent, inject } from ‘vue’

export default defineComponent({
setup () {
const store = inject(‘store’)

return { store }
}
})

I’m not excited about this extra verbosity, but it is more explicit and more flexible, which I am a fan of. This type of code is generally written once right away at the beginning of the project and then it doesn’t bother you again, though now you’ll either need to provide each new store or import it every time you wish to use it, but importing or injecting code modules is how we generally have to work with anything else, so it’s just making Vuex work more along the lines of how people already tend to work.

Using A Store

Apart from being a fan of the flexibility and the new way of defining stores the same way as a component using the composition API, there’s one more thing that makes me more excited than everything else: how stores are used. Here’s what it looks like to use a store in Vuex 4.

store.state.count // Access State
store.getters.double // Access Getters
store.commit(‘increment’) // Mutate State
store.dispatch(‘increment’) // Run Actions

State, getters, mutations, and actions are all handled in different ways via different properties or methods. This has the advantage of explicitness, which I praised earlier, but this explicitness doesn’t really gain us anything. And this API only gets more difficult to use when you are using namespaced modules. By comparison, Vuex 5 looks to work exactly how you would normally hope:

store.count // Access State
store.double // Access Getters (transparent)
store.increment() // Run actions
// No Mutators

Everything — the state, getters and actions — is available directly at the root of the store, making it simple to use with a lot less verbosity and practically removes all need for using mapState, mapGetters, mapActions and mapMutations for the options API or for writing extra computed statements or simple functions for composition API. This simply makes a Vuex store look and act just like a normal store that you would build yourself, but it gets all the benefits of plugins, debugging tools, official documentation, etc.

Composing Stores

The final aspect of Vuex 5 we’ll look at today is composability. Vuex 5 doesn’t have namespaced modules that are all accessible from the single store. Each of those modules would be split into a completely separate store. That’s simple enough to deal with for components: they just import whichever stores they need and fire them up and use them. But what if one store wants to interact with another store? In v4, the namespacing convolutes the whole thing, so you need to use the namespace in your commit and dispatch calls, use rootGetters and rootState and then work your way up into the namespaces you want to access getters and state from. Here’s how it works in Vuex 5:

// store/greeter.js
import { defineStore } from ‘vuex’

export default defineStore({
name: ‘greeter’,
state () {
return { greeting: ‘Hello’ }
}
})

// store/counter.js
import { defineStore } from ‘vuex’
import greeterStore from ‘./greeter’ // Import the store you want to interact with

export default defineStore({
name: ‘counter’,

// Then use the store
use () {
return { greeter: greeterStore }
},

state () {
return { count: 0 }
},

getters: {
greetingCount () {
return `${this.greeter.greeting} ${this.count}’ // access it from this.greeter
}
}
})

With v5, we import the store we wish to use, then register it with use and now it’s accessible all over the store at whatever property name you gave it. Things are even simpler if you’re using the composition API variation of the store definition:

// store/counter.js
import { ref, computed } from ‘vue’
import { defineStore } from ‘vuex’
import greeterStore from ‘./greeter’ // Import the store you want to interact with

export default defineStore(‘counter’, ({use}) => { // use is passed in to function
const greeter = use(greeterStore) // use use and now you have full access
const count = 0

const greetingCount = computed(() => {
return ${greeter.greeting} ${this.count} // access it like any other variable
})

return { count, greetingCount }
})

No more namespaced modules. Each store is separate and is used separately. You can use use to make a store available inside another store to compose them. In both examples, use is basically just the same mechanism as vuex.store from earlier and they ensure that we instantiating the stores with the correct instance of Vuex.

TypeScript Support

For TypeScript users, one of the greatest aspects of Vuex 5 is that the simplification made it simpler to add types to everything. The layers of abstraction that older versions of Vuex had made it nearly impossible and right now, with Vuex 4, they increased our ability to use types, but there is still too much manual work to get a decent amount of type support, whereas in v5, you can put your types inline, just as you would hope and expect.

Conclusion

Vuex 5 looks to be almost exactly what I — and likely many others — hoped it would be, and I feel it can’t come soon enough. It simplifies most of Vuex, removing some of the mental overhead involved, and only gets more complicated or verbose where it adds flexibility. Leave comments below about what you think of these changes and what changes you might make instead or in addition. Or go straight to the source and add an RFC (Request for Comments) to the list to see what the core team thinks.

How To Retain Customers During Covid-19

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Designrfix/~3/BNiCHUHZzW4/how-to-retain-customers-during-covid-19

Customers in Canada are stuck inside with little to do other than work from home and teach their children. Covid-19 has changed lives in recent history, and people are struggling with what to do with all their time. When looking for a Canadian online casino, real money casinos are plentiful in this growing market. All […]

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30 Gifts to Get Under $10 (Gift Exchange Ideas)

Original Source: https://www.hongkiat.com/blog/ideas-for-tech-gifts/

Gah! The gift exchange period is here. Whether you are at the office, or part of a community, the gift exchange tradition always has to happen. If you’re playing Secret Santa then you’d…

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20 Pocket-Sized Gift Ideas to Help Spread The Christmas Love

Original Source: https://www.hongkiat.com/blog/pocket-sized-gifts/

You probably have checked out most of the gift ideas available out there, but if you’re not into bulky gifts that could burn a hole in your pocket, then check out the pocket-sized options we…

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