Smart Interface Design Patterns In Your Pocket: Checklist Cards PDF

Original Source: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2020/08/checklist-cards-release/

Smart Interface Design Patterns In Your Pocket: Checklist Cards PDF

Smart Interface Design Patterns In Your Pocket: Checklist Cards PDF

Vitaly Friedman

2020-08-04T14:00:00+00:00
2020-08-04T19:34:38+00:00

Every UI component, no matter if it’s an accordion, a hamburger navigation, a data table, or a carousel, brings along its unique challenges. Coming up with a new solution for every problem takes time, and often it’s really not necessary. We can rely on smart design patterns and usability tests, and ask the right questions ahead of time to avoid issues down the line.

Smart Interface Design Patterns Checklists

Meet “Smart Interface Design Checklists”, with questions to ask when designing and building any interface component.

Meet Interface Design Patterns Checklists, a deck of 100 cards with common questions to ask while dealing with any interface challenge — from intricate data tables and web forms to troublesome hamburgers and carousels. Plus, many other components (full list ↓), explored in full detail.

Each checklist has been curated and refined for years by yours truly — all based upon usability sessions, design iterations and A/B tests. Useful for designers & front-end developers to discuss everything a component requires before starting designing or coding.

And if you’d like to dive into design patterns live, attend our upcoming online workshops on Smart Interface Design Patterns, 2020 Edition, where we’ll explore 100s of practical examples over 5×2.5h live sessions.

Checklist Card Box

Print + eBook

eBook

Workshop + Checklists

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{“amount”: “1.00”, “type”: “E-Book”}
]
}
]
}

$
375.00

$
450.00

Attend Online Workshop

Vitaly’s 5×2.5h online workshop, with the checklists PDF, live sessions and examples.

Checklists PDF Deck

{
“sku”: “checklist-cards”,
“type”: “E-Book”,
“price”: “10.00”,

“prices”: [{
“amount”: “10.00”,
“currency”: “USD”
}, {
“amount”: “10.00”,
“currency”: “EUR”
}
]
}

$
10.00

Free!

Get Checklists PDF

DRM-free, of course.

PDF.
Included with Smashing Membership.

Get the eBook

Download PDF.
Thanks for being smashing! ❤️

About The Checklists

Meet 100 checklist cards with everything you need to tackle any UI challenge — from intricate tables to troublesome carousels. Created to help us all keep track of all the fine little details to design and build better interfaces, faster. Plus, it’s useful to not forget anything critical and avoid costly mistakes down the line. Check the preview.

When working on pretty much any interface problem, we sit down with designers and developers and talk about its design, markup and behavior — using checklists. The deck creates a much-needed sense of alignment, so everyone is one the same page before jumping into design or coding tools.

The deck includes checklists on:

designing for touch (free preview),
hamburger menu and accordions,
carousels and navigation,
filtering, sorting, search,
data tables and feature comparison,
pricing plans and product page,
sliders and video players,
configurators and wizards,
date pickers and calendars,
timelines, maps, seating plans,
privacy and authentication,
onboarding and offboarding,
reviews and testimonials,
video and audio players,
web forms and donation forms.
Plus, 400 practical interface examples (free preview).

A look inside the Checklist Card box.

Beautifully designed by our dear illustrator Ricardo Gimenes, this deck is always by your side — on your desk or on your phone when you’re on the go.

Additionally, you get practical examples, action points and the checklists in a wide resolution (16×9) for reference and presentations.

Spotify slider example

Hamburger design checklist

A little bonus: 400 practical examples, action points and the checklist in 16×9.

You’ll get:

100 checklists cards on everything from carousels to web forms, carefully curated and designed,
Practical examples and action points for your reference in 16×9,
Editable text file to adjust for your needs,
Life-time access to the deck, updated regularly.
Attend online workshop or get the checklist PDF.

A look inside the card deck.

Print + eBook

eBook

Workshop + Checklists

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“sales_price”: “375.00”,
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{“amount”: “374.00”, “type”: “Book”},
{“amount”: “1.00”, “type”: “E-Book”}
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}

$
375.00

$
450.00

Attend Online Workshop

Vitaly’s 5×2.5h online workshop, with the checklists PDF, live sessions and examples.

Checklists PDF Deck

{
“sku”: “checklist-cards”,
“type”: “E-Book”,
“price”: “10.00”,

“prices”: [{
“amount”: “10.00”,
“currency”: “USD”
}, {
“amount”: “10.00”,
“currency”: “EUR”
}
]
}

$
10.00

Free!

Get Checklists PDF

DRM-free, of course.

PDF.
Included with Smashing Membership.

Get the eBook

Download PDF.
Thanks for being smashing! ❤️

Table of Contents

Designing For Touch Checklist

+

Overall, 26 questions, including:

Input is never precise: are hit targets at least 48×48px? Can users tap on the same spot to undo actions? Do we expose critical navigation at the bottom on mobile?

Accordion Checklist

+

Overall, 14 questions, including:

What icon do we choose to indicate expansion? Should expanded sections collapse automatically? Should the user be scrolled automatically when expanded?

Navigation Checklist

+

Overall, 30 questions, including:

Do drop-downs appear/disappear on hover, tap/click, or both? Do nav items appear in a full page/partial overlay or slide-in? Can we split the nav vertically for sub-menus on mobile?

Hamburger Menu Checklist

+

Overall, 23 questions, including:

Can we avoid a hamburger icon and show navigation as is? What happens when the user opens both search and hamburger? Do we expose critical navigation by default on desktop/mobile?

Filtering Checklist

+

Overall, 25 questions, including:

Do we expose popular or relevant filters by default? Do we display the number of expected results for each filter? Do we apply filters automatically or manually on “Apply” button?

Sorting Checklist

+

Overall, 32 questions, including:

Do we repeat sorting at the bottom of the content list? Do we include the “Sort by” label separately from the buttons/dropdown? Does the default sorting reflect the diversity of all major product types?

Search Autocomplete Checklist

+

Overall, 33 questions, including:

Do we surface frequent hits, popular searches, products or categories at the top of autosuggestions? On what character do we start displaying autosuggestions? Do we use a look-ahead pattern for search queries?

Carousels Checklist

+

Overall, 37 questions, including:

Can we just show a grid of images instead of a carousel? Is there a way to pause a carousel if it’s auto-rotating? How do we choose the sequence of slides?

Tables Checklist

+

Overall, 28 questions, including:

Do we add steppers to navigate through columns or rows predictably? Do we highlight the cell, row or column on user’s tap/click? With rows as cards on mobile, do we expose relevant data for comparison?

Pricing Plans Checklist

+

Overall, 51 questions, including:

How many features do we want to display per plan? Do we want to allow customers to switch currency (€/$/£)? Can we avoid requiring credit card data for the free trial period?

Sliders Checklist

+

Overall, 19 questions, including:

Do we provide a text input fallback for precise input? Are there any values on a slider that shouldn’t be accepting? Should users be able to “lock” some values?

Date Pickers Checklist

+

Overall, 20 questions, including:

What presets (‘prev day’/’current day’) do we need for faster navigation? Do we use dots color coding for different rates or days? How do we avoid displaying unavailable dates or zero-results?

Configurators Checklist

+

Overall, 33 questions, including:

What’s the entry point to the configurator? Should the user automatically move to the next step when finished? For every step, do we explain and highlight dependencies?

Feature Comparison Checklist

+

Overall, 27 questions, including:

Can users see only differences, similarities and selected attributes for all products/plans? Can the user move columns left and right? Should we ask customers to choose preferred attributes?

Timelines Checklist

+

Overall, 24 questions, including:

How do we expose/highlight critical events (e.g. now/coming up next)? Should some events or time segments be available/fixed at all times? Do we communicate changes over time with an underlying histogram?

Schedule And Calendars Checklist

+

Overall, 25 questions, including:

Do we provide quick jumps between tracks? Should we consider flipping the timing header by 90 degrees? Do we display what’s happening now and coming up next?

Maps Checklist

+

Overall, 26 questions, including:

Do we provide zooming? How many levels of depth will zoom provide? Would an autocomplete search help users find information faster? For charts, can we flip axis to make use of available space?

Seating Plans Checklist

+

Overall, 23 questions, including:

What kinds of pricing tiers and discounted tickets (senior, student) do we have? Do we have any planes or floors that users need to navigate between? Do we calculate and display an experience score for each seat?

Privacy Checklist

+

Overall, 44 questions, including:

Can we group user data according to low/medium/high priority? Can we gradually request more user permissions when we need them? Do we ask for permissions only if we are likely to get them?

Onboarding Checklist

+

Overall, 15 questions, including:

Can we avoid intro tours, tooltips, wizards and slideshows as they are usually skipped? Do we use empty state to indicate our features? When is the right timing to show a particular feature?

Reviews and Testimonials Checklist

+

Overall, 36 questions, including:

Can we group testimonials by a feature/impact and highlight them together? Do we highlight the number of testimonials/reviews prominently? Do we display name, photo, title, age, location, role, company, brand logo?

Web Forms Checklist

+

Overall, 76 questions, including:

Will we be using floating labels? If so, are they accessible? For a country selector, do we display some countries as frequently used? Do we show the number of errors above the “Submit” button and in the tab title as a prefix?

Donation Form Checklist

+

Overall, 32 questions, including:

Do we include any testimonials or stories next to the donation form? What suggested donation amounts do we display, and how many? Which types of donations do we have: one-off, monthly, quarterly, annually?

Authentication Checklist

+

Overall, 34 questions, including:

What password requirements do we want/need to implement? Do we really need CAPTCHA, or can we use honeypot/time traps instead? Do we limit the frequency of password recovery attempts?

Product Page Checklist

+

Overall, 76 questions, including:

What layout do we use for the page (tabs, accordions, one long page, floating bar)? Do we display the final price (incl. standard shipping, taxes, payment fees, currency)? What do we display when an item is out of stock (notification via SMS/email)?

Video Player Checklist

+

Overall, 33 questions, including:

How do we optimize for precise input and fast-forwards (keyboard, buttons)? Do we use preview clips, popularity bar, key moments preview? Do we persist the position of the video track on refresh?

About the Author

Vitaly FriedmanVitaly Friedman loves beautiful content and doesn’t like to give in easily. When he is not writing or speaking at a conference, he’s most probably running front-end/UX workshops and webinars. He loves solving complex UX, front-end and performance problems. Get in touch.

“Smart Interface Design Patterns, 2020 Edition”, Online Workshop with Vitaly Friedman (Sep 22 – Oct 6)

Do you want to dive deeper into the bits and pieces of smart interface design patterns? We’ll be hosting a series of online workshops, in which we’ll take a microscopic examination of common interface components and reliable solutions to get them right — both on desktop and on mobile.

We’ll study 100s of hand-picked examples and we’ll design interfaces live, from mega-dropdowns and car configurators — all the way to timelines and onboarding. And: we’ll be reviewing and providing feedback to each other’s work. Check all topics and schedule.

Example of autocomplete in three different online shops.

Google slider example

Carousel Design Checklist

Vitaly’s Smart Interface Design Patterns Workshop, broken down into 5×2.5h sessions, with 100s of practical examples.

<!–

The workshop includes:

1500+ workshop slides with practical examples and action points
100 checklist cards on everything from carousels to web forms
Editable text file to adjust for your needs
Life-time access to the deck, updated regularly
Live, interactive workshop sessions
Hands-on exercises and reviews
All workshop recordings
Dedicated Q&A time for all your questions
A Smashing Certificate

–>

The workshop is delivered in five 2.5h long sessions with lots of time for you to ask all your questions. It’s for interface designers, front-end designers and developers who’d love to be prepared for any challenge coming their way.

You’ll walk away with a toolbox of practical techniques for your product, website, desktop app or a mobile app.

Print + eBook

eBook

Workshop + Checklists

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“price”: “450.00”,
“sales_price”: “375.00”,
“prices”: [{
“amount”: “450.00”,
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{“amount”: “449.00”, “type”: “Book”},
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]
}, {
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“currency”: “EUR”,
“items”: [
{“amount”: “449.00”, “type”: “Book”},
{“amount”: “1.00”, “type”: “E-Book”}
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{“amount”: “374.00”, “type”: “Book”},
{“amount”: “1.00”, “type”: “E-Book”}
]
}, {
“amount”: “375.00”,
“currency”: “EUR”,
“items”: [
{“amount”: “374.00”, “type”: “Book”},
{“amount”: “1.00”, “type”: “E-Book”}
]
}
]
}

$
375.00

$
450.00

Attend Online Workshop

Vitaly’s 5×2.5h online workshop, with the checklists PDF, live sessions and examples.

Checklists PDF Deck

{
“sku”: “checklist-cards”,
“type”: “E-Book”,
“price”: “10.00”,

“prices”: [{
“amount”: “10.00”,
“currency”: “USD”
}, {
“amount”: “10.00”,
“currency”: “EUR”
}
]
}

$
10.00

Free!

Get Checklists PDF

DRM-free, of course.

PDF.
Included with Smashing Membership.

Get the eBook

Download PDF.
Thanks for being smashing! ❤️

Thank You For Your Support!

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10 Unique Playing Cards (With Cool Design) For The Collectors

Original Source: https://www.hongkiat.com/blog/unique-playing-cards/

According to Wikipedia playing cards gave been around for over 1,100 years now. They have changed considerably since then. Different variations of decks have been created, yet what we recognize as a…

Visit hongkiat.com for full content.

64 top-class Photoshop tutorials to try

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/CreativeBloq/~3/sMgcoD0fw30/photoshop-tutorials-1232677

Photoshop tutorials are something that every user can benefit from, whatever your level of experience. When you're first starting out, the best beginner-level Photoshop tutorials can help you grasp the basics and set you on the right path. As you progress, you'll find that intermediate Photoshop tutorials can boost your skills and introduce you to new techniques. And even when you're a veteran of the software, there are always advanced Photoshop tutorials that can introduce you to new features and ambitious projects that can pull you out of your creative comfort zone and stretch your abilities yet further.

In many ways, it's a case of running to stand still, because Photoshop is expanding and adding features all the time, not to mention brand new ways of using it, such as Photoshop on the iPad. So there are always going to be more tricks you can learn.

With all that in mind, here's our round-up of the best Photoshop tutorials you can access for free on the web today. And don't forget to improve your Photoshop experience even further, with our roundups of the best free Photoshop brushes and the latest Photoshop plugins.

Get Adobe Creative Cloud
Tutorials for beginners
01. Photoshop for beginners

If you’re a complete novice, then Photoshop tutorials are a great way to get your head around the software. In this three-hour video, Dan Scott, an Adobe certified instructor for Envato Tuts+, walks you through everything you need to get started. There’s no need for any previous Photoshop knowledge, or photography or design skills for that matter. If you want to jump ahead, the different sections and timings are all listed on the YouTube page.

02. Learn Photoshop in 5 minutes: beginner tutorial

Pushed for time? There are many short and sweet Photoshop tutorials for beginners out there, and here's one of our favourites. In just five minutes, Julian Ball of Flow Graphics walks you through the basic tools and interface, and gives you a good idea of what the software is all about.

03. Get to know Photoshop

Photo of woman holding flowers

Part of a series of Photoshop tutorials produced by Adobe itself, Get to know Photoshop teaches you the basic tools and techniques of the software. You'll be introduced to the work area and will learn how to open and save your images, zoom in and out, and undo mistakes. 

04. How to resize an image

Photoshop tutorials: resize

Image resizing is probably one of the first things you'll want to do as a beginner, and here's one of the best Photoshop tutorials to explain it. How to resize an image on Photoshop teaches you how to change canvas size, use trim and more, all without compromising too much on image quality. 

05. How to work with layers

Photoshop tutorials: interface featuring multiple photos

Layers are one of those fundamental concepts you'll need to get your head around, and here's another of Adobe's own Photoshop tutorials to walk you through the basics. How to work with layers teaches you what layers are and how to use the Layers panel, how to resize the contents of a layer, and how to add images to a layered file.

06. How to adjust image quality

Photoshop tutorials: Photo of flowers on table

Discover how to adjust image quality with this most succinct of Photoshop tutorials. This series of four videos will teach you to enhance brightness and colour, and improve the quality of your images in Photoshop.

07. How to make selections

Photoshop tutorials: Photo of road featuring a number of neon hotel signs

Some Photoshop tutorials help you master vital skills quickly and easily, and here's a great example. How to make selections reveals how to create a selection, work with selection tools, and fine-tune the edges of a selection.

08. How to retouch images

Photoshop tutorials: Woman preparing plants on table

How to retouch images is a trio of Photoshop tutorials in video form. They walk you through how to remove unwanted objects, add objects by cloning, and fix other imperfections in your images with retouching tools in Photoshop.

09. How to add text and shapes

Photoshop tutorials: Adding text to a picture in Photoshop

This collection of four Photoshop tutorials demonstrates how to add text and shapes. When you do so, they remain editable, and you can customise them down to the smallest detail.

10. How to use the Photoshop Pen tool

Photoshop tutorials: Pen tool

In one of Creative Bloq's own Photoshop tutorials, Mark White explains how to use the Photoshop Pen tool, a simple selection feature that enables you to fill, stroke or make selections from whatever you draw. 

11. How to use the Brush tool

Photoshop tutorials: Pen tool

In another of our Photoshop tutorials from Mark White, you'll discover how to use the Brush tool in Photoshop. This step-by-step guide includes helpful guides to what each of the icons in the Brush palette mean.

12. How to make a photo collage

Learn how to combine images to make a simple photo collage in Photoshop with this tutorial from Matt Smith. You can use this technique to create your own collages from photographs, and perhaps eventually build on your compositions to create more intricate design collages from your own creations.

13. How to apply filters

Photoshop tutorials: interface with multiple photos

Learn how to apply filters, allowing you add quick effects to an image. Filters can also be combined to create unique results, as these two related Photoshop tutorials demonstrate nicely.

14. Edit your first photo

Photoshop tutorials: Edit your first photo

Photoshop tutorials for beginners can be found on a range of subjects, and this one teaches you how to edit your first photo. Bring out the best in your images with the useful techniques outlined here. 

15. How to use Photoshop layer masks

Photoshop tutorials: layer masks

One of Creative Bloq's own Photoshop tutorials, How to use Photoshop layer masks will help you streamline your digital art workflow. As any beginner will quickly learn, layer masks are one of the most fundamental parts of the software: without them your work will look flat. Follow these tips and shortcuts to work more quickly and easily. 

16. How to remove a background in Photoshop

photoshop tutorials: remove a background in Photoshop

Another of our own Photoshops tutorials takes you through several different ways to remove a background in Photoshop. Jo Gulliver starts off by taking you through how to use the Magic Wand tool and Quick Selection tools to remove a background, before moving on to more advanced techniques.

17. Create your first design

Photoshop tutorials: Create your first design

Create your first design is a series of Photoshop tutorials that introduces how to work with layers, combine images, use layer masks, and add creative graphics, text, and effects. You can then use these skills to combine design assets into a simple, unique composite for print or online use. 

18. How to make a meme in Photoshop

Meme featuring dog wearing sunglasses

Social media’s all about memes these days, and making them is a useful skill to have. In one of our most recent Photoshop tutorials, How to make a meme in Photoshop, Matt Smith explains how to make multiple memes in moments.

19. How to use Photoshop layers: 6 top tips

Photoshop tutorials: how to use layers

This tutorial, How to use Photoshop layers: 6 top tips, will teach you to use Photoshop's layer system; the key to unlocking the software's versatility. Here, you’ll find out how to create layers, lock them, group them and adjust opacity. 

20. Digital painting with Photoshop CC for beginners

Photoshop tutorials: Digital painting

Digital painting with Photoshop for beginners breaks down the process of creating a simple digital painting, from start to finish. If you can work on a canvas with paints, then many of the same painting techniques you use will transfer directly over to digitally painting in Photoshop.

Next page: Intermediate Photoshop tutorials

21. How to Photoshop on the iPhone

Photoshop tutorials: Spiral staircase

Want to use Photoshop on your mobile? In one of Creative Bloq's most popular recent Photoshop tutorials, How to Photoshop on the iPhone, Jason Parnell-Brookes walks you through three ways of doing so. Each technique uses a different, free app: Photoshop Express, Photoshop Mix or Photoshop Fix.

22. How to flip a layer in Photoshop

Photoshop tutorials: Two birds in wilderness

Discover how to flip a layer in Photoshop, and then blend the results with the original. In another of his excellent Photoshop tutorials for Creative Bloq, Matt Smith walks you through the process in six easy steps.

23. How to add fonts in Photoshop 

Photoshop tutorials: Fonts in interface

Whether you’re on a Mac or a Windows, adding fonts in Photoshop is nothing to be daunted by. In this tutorial, How to add fonts in Photoshop, Matt Smith explains how to go about it.

24. Create an old-school anaglyph effect

Photoshop tutorials: drawing of woman in red and blue colours

An anaglyph effect is the vintage style of 3D where you have to wear red and blue glasses to appreciate the content. One of last year's best Photoshop tutorials, Create an old-school anaglyph effect, explains how to achieve this classic effect using base images, shading and textures.

25. How to Photoshop someone into a picture

Photoshop tutorials: man in dinosaur painting

Editing a photo of somebody into an illustrated scene is a useful technique. In this most easy to follow of Photoshop tutorials, How to Photoshop someone into a picture, Matt Smith explains how to do so in six steps.

26. Visual development tips in Photoshop

Digital painting of ghost girl in pool

Learn how to hone your storytelling skills and use them to create a visual development scene in Photoshop.  This workshop focuses on creating a pre-visual development, which is about painting gorgeous scenery. 

27. How to create masks in Photoshop

Photoshop tutorials: masks

Crafting your own digital art masks can seem daunting at first, but once you start using them you’ll never go back. In How to create masks in Photoshop, Paul Canavan offers tips to get you started.

28. Create textures with the Pattern Stamp tool 

pattern stamp tool

Photoshop's Pattern Stamp tool can be a godsend when you want to create ideas and concepts as quickly as you can. In this most visually inspiring of Photoshop tutorials, Lino Drieghe explains how to use the Pattern Stamp tool to create a variety of textures and colours and your own custom patterns. 

29. Six essential Photoshop layers to improve your images

Photoshop tutorials: layers

In 6 essential Photoshop layers to improve your images, James Paterson outlines the six most frequently used Photoshop layers for image editing, and explains how you can use them to improve almost any photo.

30. How to use smart layers in Photoshop

Photoshop tutorials: smart layers

When incorporating repeating designs and patterns into an illustration, smart layers are your friend. In this tutorials, How to use smart layers in Photoshop, Alix Branwyn teaches you how to use them to create a separate layered PSD that can be embedded into your original PSD.

31. How to manage colours in Photoshop

Photoshop tutorials: colours

How to manage colours in Photoshop is a helpful tutorial in which Sebastian Bleak provides an overview for anyone new to colour management, with practical advice for managing colours in Photoshop. 

32. Get creative with Photoshop Blend Modes

Photoshop tutorials: blend modes

Combining layers and images can allow you to create a huge variety of effects. For one of Creative Bloq's own Photoshop tutorials, Get creative with Photoshop Blend Modes, James Paterson explains how these effects work, and some of the wonderful things you can do with them.

33. Photoshop for web design: pro tips

Photoshop tutorials: web design

There aren't that many Photoshop tutorials covering its use in web design, but here's a great one. In Photoshop for web design: 20 pro tips, David Everly and Dan Rose offer tips for being efficient when creating website graphics.

34. Make a composite in Photoshop

Make a composite in Photoshop is another in Adobe’s one-minute series of Photoshop tutorials. Here, you'll learn a quick way to make a composite in the software, in the time it takes you to boil a kettle.

35. Make an animated GIF in Photoshop

Who doesn’t love an animated GIF? Learn how to craft your own by following this video from Adobe on how to make an animated GIF in Photoshop. 

36. Get creative with Face-Aware Liquify

Photoshop tutorial: face aware liquify

In one of Creative Bloq's best Photoshop tutorials, Get creative with Face-Aware Liquify, Luke O'Neill explores the Liquify tool. This has some powerful facial recognition skills, enabling it to detect areas of the face, such as the eyes, mouth and overall face shape, so you can adjust and warp them with impunity. 

37. Create style frames in Photoshop

Photoshop tutorials: style frames

This tutorial teaches you how to create style frames in Photoshop. A style frame is a snapshot of a finished frame as it would look within a longer animation. It aims to capture the overall look and feel of an animation, but in a still image.

38. Make a double exposure in Photoshop

Here's aother of Adobe 60-second Photoshop tutorials under the 'Make It Now' banner. Make a double exposure in Photoshop shows you to create an impressive double exposure effect.

39. The Refine Edge box tool explained

Photoshop tutorials: Dog with bow on head

Learn about the seven main features of the Refine Edge tool in this Photoshop tutorial, The Refine Edge box tool explained. If you've ever tried to change the background of a person with frizzy hair or a horizon dotted with bushy foliage, you'll know just how intensely time consuming this can be. Luckily Refine Edge is here to make your life easier. 

40. Combine traditional and digital skills to create a comic cover

Photoshop tutorials: Comic covers

Combine traditional and digital skills to create a comic cover shows you how to draw an illustration by hand, then take it into Photoshop to colour and light it, then add eye-catching filters.  If you like working with traditional materials, this is one of the best Photoshop tutorials to help give your work more impact. 

41. Rapid site prototyping in Photoshop

Photoshop tutorials: rapid prototyping

Photoshop offers a comprehensive toolset for mocking up websites quickly and easily. In Rapid site prototyping in Photoshop, Antony Kitson explains how to use the key features to get an idea across to a client or developer.

42. Age a photograph in Photoshop

Photoshop tutorials: age a photo

Another of Creative Bloq's most popular Photoshop tutorials, this will teach you to age a photograph in Photoshop using the duotone technique. This will help you turn a ho-hum, full colour image into something striking. 

43. How to remove wrinkles in Photoshop

Learning how to remove wrinkles is the kind of thing that Photoshop tutorials are made for. Here, award-winning photographer Jason Parnell-Brookes walks you through how to parse out some crow's feet and tone down some deeper folds, while keeping your subject looking natural. 

44. Make a poster from a template in Photoshop

Make a poster from a template in Photoshop show you how to make a poster from a template. Another of Adobe's super-short Photoshop tutorials (under 60 seconds), this walkthrough will have you designing posters faster than ever.

45. How to make a logo in Photoshop

Photoshop tutorial: make a logo in Photoshop

Okay, so Photoshop isn't the ideal place to make a logo. You'll probably want to use Illustrator if you can. But if Photoshop's all you've got, then follow this guide to how to make a logo in Photoshop.

Next page: Advanced Photoshop tutorials

46. Colourise greyscale work in Photoshop

Photoshop tutorials: colourise

In Colourise greyscale work in Photoshop, one of his Photoshop tutorials for Creative Bloq, Stephan McGowan walks you through the techniques and tools he uses to create full-colour images from a greyscale line-art starting point, using Photoshop's default tools. 

47. Create a glowing neon text effect

Photoshop tutorials: neon text

Learn how to create a glowing neon text effect: it’s much easier than you might think, says Mark White. This Photoshop tutorial shows you how to do so using just one background image.

48. Use the Pen tool and textures to add depth

Photoshop tutorials: pen tool

Here's another example of the great Photoshop tutorials you'll find on Creative Bloq. Follow along as Illustrator Charlie Davis shows you how to use the Pen tool and textures to add depth. He offers a series of core techniques for creating a peaceful countryside scene; you’ll also learn how to apply masks, and how to use textures from Adobe Stock to add depth and warmth.

49. Paint colourful art in Photoshop

Photoshop tutorials: paint colourful art

In Paint colourful art in Photoshop, Randy Bishop outlines several key techniques he uses as an illustrator in Photoshop: rough concepts, clean line work, colour, light and shadow, and some of the pitfalls that people tend to fall into while working through an illustration.

50. How to add 3D art to a Photoshop image

Photoshop tutorials: 3D art

Adobe Fuse offers a simple way to create and customise 3D characters in a matter of minutes. This has been the subject of many recent Photoshop tutorials, and here's one of the best. How to add 3D art to a Photoshop image explains how Fuse works, and shows how to combine 3D creations with a 2D image for a dramatic composite.

51. Master the Mixer brush in Photoshop

Photoshop tutorials: mixer brush

One of those advanced Photoshop tutorials that's actually pretty simple to follow. In Master the Mixer brush in Photoshop, Wangjie Li teaches you to quickly make brushstrokes in the style of a traditional artist. 

52. Seven essential Photoshop Blend mode tips and tricks

Photoshop tutorials: overlay

In 7 essential Photoshop Blend mode tips and tricks, James Paterson explores the most useful Blend modes and how they can help you in your day to day work. Whether you’re dodging and burning, hand-painting or portrait‑toning, this is one of those Photoshop tutorials that aims to make your life easier. 

53. How to use control points in Photoshop

Photoshop tutorials: control points

This tutorial explains how to use control points in Photoshop. Most Photoshop users will be familiar with making selections or using masks to isolate areas for selective adjustments, but control points are different. You simply click on a point, adjust the circular area to fit over whatever you want to target, and the software will work out what you want to adjust by seeking out similar tones.

54. How to transform a pencil sketch

Photoshop tutorials: sketches

Another one of those Photoshop tutorials that delivers exactly what it promises. In How to transform a pencil sketch, Don Seegmiller walks through how you can make your hand-drawn sketches easier to work with in Photoshop. 

55. How to use Photoshop's 'Match Font' feature

Photoshop tutorials: match font

This tutorial will teach you how to use Photoshop’s ‘Match Font’ feature. This helps take the legwork out of laborious tasks like scouring your font book, your type client, or online foundries to get the closest match to the typography sample you’ve seen. Luke O’Neill reveals how to get the best results from it.

56. Create painterly effects in Photoshop CC

Here are two video-based Photoshop tutorials from Adobe to help you take your Photoshop skills to the next level. Create painterly effects in Photoshop CC begins by Kyle T. Webster explain how to use the Mixer brush tool to add life to simple shapes. 

The second tutorial then shows you how to use Adobe Stock to add some context to your digital painting. You'll create painterly effects using Photoshop's range of Edvard Munch paintbrushes.

57. The ultimate guide to compositing images in Photoshop

Photoshop tutorials: compositing images

Of all Photoshop projects, compositing images into one fantastic frame is perhaps the most enjoyable and creative pursuit. In this tutorial, The ultimate guide to compositing images in Photoshop, you'll discover how to shoot, build and finish off convincing  composites. 

58. Colour in Photoshop: top tricks

Photoshop tutorials: colour

Here's one of the most colourful Photoshops tutorials to raise your mood. Colour in Photoshop: top tricks teaches you how to paint with muted colours and create a festival scene tinged with nostalgia, featuring Hong Kong’s Lion Dancers, using various Photoshop effects. 

59. Turn photos into 3D animations with Photoshop

Photoshop tutorials: 3D animations

Want to truly breathe some fresh air into your old still albums, using its timeline capabilities? Then here's one of the best Photoshop tutorials we can suggest. Turn photos into 3D animations with Photoshop shows you how to extra add depth to photos, or even animate the results.

60. Get more from custom Photoshop brushes

Photoshop tutorials: brushes

Get more from custom Photoshop brushes is a tutorial that shows you the endless things that can be done with custom brushes inside Photoshop's Natural Brush Media window. Learn how to manipulate your brush to create patterns, textures, hair, a painterly feel, happy accidents and so on.

61. Create a cinemagraph with Photoshop in 60 seconds

Cinemagraphs, which are basically a more sophisticated varient of the animated GIF, are all the rage at the moment. Another of Adobe's 'Make It Now' Photoshop tutorials, Create a cinemagraph with Photoshop in 60 seconds shows you how to do exactly that, in one minute flat. 

62. Depict light glowing through fur

When painting digital light in fur, Photoshop's strong light layer styles can help, and depict light glowing through fur shows you how to do it. By switching between Soft Light, Hard Light and Overlay, and seeing what works best, you can achieve that very particular kind of glowing light that appears when light is scattered through and between strands of hair. 

63. Photoshop tips: next-level lighting advice

Photoshop tutorials: light

Photoshop tips: next-level lighting advice is one of those Photoshop tutorials that does exactly what it says on the tin. Following these insights on lighting from Suzanne Helmigh will give your digital art an extra level of realism.

64. Turn day into night using Photoshop

Photoshop tutorials: day to night

How to turn day into night using Photoshop teaches you how to convert a sunny landscape into an atmospheric night scene. The simple step-by-step guide makes this useful digital art technique a breeze to put into practice.

Read more:

The best free fonts for designersBuild prototypes with Adobe XDAdobe Fresco review

Will the 12-inch MacBook return fully 'ARM'ed?

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/CreativeBloq/~3/FLq0KUaY10k/12-inch-macbook-return

An Apple-made CPU is the tastiest rumour we've heard for sometime, and it seems it's about to come to fruition. It's been suggested by a reliable Apple leaker that the company may be about to ditch Intel in favour of its own ARM processor, and that the announcement could be coming as soon this year's online WWDC conference, scheduled to take place on June 22. 

If the rumours are to be believed, the 12-inch MacBook will be the first model to contain the ARM processor, which could be released in 2021 – giving outside developers enough time to catch up with the technology shift. 

Want to get the most out of your Apple devices? Try the best monitors for the MacBook Pro, and our pick of the iPad apps for designers you have to try.

Browse MacBooks at Apple.com

MacBook

Will the 12-inch MacBook be the recipient of the much-anticipated ARM chip?

According to leaker Fudge (@chocobit on Twitter), who shared detailed predictions on Reddit, the move comes as the next stage in Apple's multi-phase plan to have all its devices kitted out with an Apple-designed chip. Plans for this first began back in 2015, with Fudge suggesting Apple is now at the stage which sees the 'release of at least one lower end model Arm Macbook', with the final rollout scheduled for 2023-2025. 

As Fudge also points out, the move will free Apple from Intel's release schedule, as well as put its market-leading technological know-how into full force. Preliminary testing has, according to Bloomberg, confirmed the superiority of Apple's chips over those of Intel when it comes to graphics, AI and battery life. 

A14 chip

The A14 chip, found in the upcoming iPhone 12

The prospective Mac processor will be based on the Apple-designed chips currently found in some iPads and iPhones (including the A14 chip found in the iPhone 12, above). It should also be noted that the MacBook system will continue to run macOS rather than the mobile device's iOS.

We're excited to reap the benefits of the ARM chip, which look to be plentiful, including lightning-fast performance and improved battery life. Crucially, it could also mean that Apple is able to start producing even thinner devices due to fewer internal components – a potential bonus for the overall design aesthetic.

But it's not all good news. These rumours also suggest the butterfly keyboard could make a comeback. Apparently, Apple hasn't given up on the system, which was replaced to thundering applause, and is working internally to correct the loud, clunky, prone to jamming setup in order to bring it back on future MacBook models. Here's hoping we hear more news on this next Monday at the annual Apple WWDC.  

Want a different model MacBook? Here are the best prices in your area:

Read more:

Is this Apple’s most ludicrous move yet?The best Apple Pencil alternatives in 2020Apple's 2020 iMac could look like a giant iPad Pro

16 Impressive SVG Animations

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/1stwebdesigner/~3/Fdc6kJOH7Ug/

Are you familiar with SVG animations? If not, you should really take some time to do so. In case you didn’t know, these awesome animations can be used on any website to add character, interest, and interactivity. They can be used for load screens, menus, and other interactive elements for increasing personality and engagement.

To save you the hassle of searching, we’ve compiled a handy list of SVG animations here that reflect the broad sense of what these animations are and how you might be able to use them on your website.

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Envato Elements

SVG Animation

See the Pen
SVG Animation by jjperezaguinaga (@jjperezaguinaga)
on CodePen.

This animation features a large circle with text in the center and buildings spinning around the outside of it. A lively, fun SVG animation sure to work well for travel websites.

SVG Loader Animation

See the Pen
SVG Loader Animation by Nikhil Krishnan (@nikhil8krishnan)
on CodePen.

This SVG loader animation is a fantastic choice for filling load time on your site. This could be used just before the main content of your site loads or when a visitor clicks on a link.

SVG Text Animation Using Stroke Offset Method

See the Pen
SVG Text Animation Using Stroke Offset Method by Mack Ayache (@Ayachem)
on CodePen.

If you need some flashy text to entice visitors, this SVG text animation would be a good fit. The blocky, stacked letters offer real appeal and visual interest.

Diving SVG Animation

See the Pen
Diving SVG Animation by Chris Gannon (@chrisgannon)
on CodePen.

Add a sense of motion to your site with this diving animation. The line continues to leap and dive across the screen. This would make a fantastic loading animation.

Circle, square, triangle, dolphin

See the Pen
Circle, square, triangle, dolphin by Max Gruson (@bleepbloop)
on CodePen.

This is a fun animation that includes shapes and a dolphin leaping across the field of view. This would make for an engaging way to keep visitors invested in your site’s content.

SVG Animation of a Desk

See the Pen
SVG animation by Hoàng Nhật (@thiennhat)
on CodePen.

If your site is for the corporate set, this SVG animation of a desk offers a cute look at a workspace. It’s interactive, too!

SVG Animation Experiment

See the Pen
SVG Animation Experiment by Hamish Williams (@HamishMW)
on CodePen.

This animation could be used for a number of purposes on your website. One way I could think of is as an email prompt. Engage visitors with the slide-in cards then once clicked, the cards compile into an envelope and are sent away. Fun!

Happy New Year 2020

See the Pen
happy new year 2020 by Swarup Kumar Kuila (@uiswarup)
on CodePen.

For something festive and fun, this Happy New Year animation could turn any website into a celebration.

Atom Loading Icon

See the Pen
Atom Loading Icon by Jon Milner (@jonmilner)
on CodePen.

Here’s another loading animation that you could use on any part of your site where you anticipate requiring visitors to wait a moment. This icon takes the shape of an atom swirling about.

404 Error Page

See the Pen
404 error page by Swarup Kumar Kuila (@uiswarup)
on CodePen.

Why not add some visual interest to your 404 page with this animation? It shows people searching with flashlights with a huge “404” looming in the spotlight.

Interactive SVG Animation

See the Pen
Interactive SVG Animation | Trick or treat_ by Issey (@issey)
on CodePen.

This is another really fun one. This animation is spooky as can be, featuring a haunted house with trick or treaters poised outside. One click of the moon and all the ghosts come out.

Li’l Vikings

See the Pen
Li´l Vikings by Fabio (@FabioG)
on CodePen.

This SVG animation shows boats and giant tentacles rolling across waves. The cartoon style is engaging and fun, and could certainly work well for a number of different websites.

Responsive Cow Jumps Over the Moon

See the Pen
Responsive Cow Jumps Over the Moooooon by Sarah Drasner (@sdras)
on CodePen.

What website doesn’t need a cow jumping over an astronaut on the moon? That’s what I want to know.

Beating Heart

See the Pen
Beating Heart – CSS and SVG animation – low poly by morkett (@morkett)
on CodePen.

This highly geometric and intricate beating heart offers visual interest and could easily be used on many sites, from science-focused to charitable projects.

Pointless Rider

See the Pen
Pointless Rider by Elliott Munoz (@elliottmunoz)
on CodePen.

This super adorable bear riding a bike could be modified for logos or just used as a fun loading screen to add interest and engagement on your site.

#1 Coffee Machine

See the Pen
#1 – Coffee Machine – SVG animation with CSS3 by Jonathan Silva (@jonathansilva)
on CodePen.

Last on our list here is an adorable animation of an anthropomorphized coffee machine, doling out cup after cup. It’s cute, it’s fun, and it could be used as a loading screen or as a section break for a coffee shop’s website.

SVG Animations Make an Impact

Though not strictly “necessary,” SVG animations add that little something extra to websites. Whether you use them as loading screens, section breaks, logos, or headers, these animations add an undeniable visual appeal to websites across every niche and category.

Now that you’re familiar with what they are and have seen some examples, maybe it’s time to start thinking about how to add them to your website.


How to make a face mask: 3 easy ways to make DIY face coverings at home

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/CreativeBloq/~3/0UKNLjYr3nM/how-to-make-a-face-mask

Want to know how to make a face mask? You've come to the right place. With governments across the globe now making wearing a face mask mandatory, face coverings are in short supply. The good news is, it's super-easy to make one for yourself and the rest of the family. 

Learning how to make a face mask doesn't have to be complicated. You don't have to work from a complex face mask pattern, do any sewing or even own a sewing machine. Here, we outline three different ways to make a homemade, non-medical face mask or face covering, as outlined by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). We've also added in our own tips on how to make the most comfortable, functional and easy to create face mask, and provided some links to buy fabric if you're short of materials. 

If you'd rather buy a face covering than make your own, then see our guide on where to buy a face mask, or use the quick links below to jump straight to retailers selling face masks right now. 

Face masks UK: Should you be wearing one? Plus where to buy themWhere to buy kids' face masks
Where to buy face masks: quick links
Etsy.co.uk – handmade face masks from just £3.99ASOS – fashionable designs at low prices Easylife – Pack of 30 surgical face masks for £29.99Buff – stylish face coverings at low pricesHYPE – get three face masks for £24.99 with 100% of profits for the NHSEbay.co.uk – washable face masks at a bargain priceVistaprint – Kids and adults face masks for $18/$13Silkies – two protective face masks for $16.99Stringking – CDC-recommended cloth masks for just $6.99Etsy.com – patterned face masks for as a little at $4Los Angeles Apparel – 3 adjustable face masks for only $30Sock Fancy – funky face masks for only $12
3 ways to make a face mask

This guide covers how to make a bandana-style face mask, how to make a face mask using a T-shirt, and how to sew your own face mask – jump to your preferred section using the links above. The first two require no sewing at all. The third does involve some needlework, either using spare fabric you have lying around at home, or some colourful or patterned fabric from a retailer like JOANN (US) or John Lewis (UK). 

Browse fabric at JOANN (US) – from just $3.99 p/yBrowse fabric at John Lewis (UK) – from just £6.50 p/m

But before we get into our instructions of making a face mask, first consider whether or not you need one at all. The official advice on this differs across the globe, but the general consensus is that wearing a homemade face mask will not help protect you from contracting Covid-19. However, it can help protect others from you passing on any germs that you may be carrying, this may be particularly useful if you are asymptomatic and don't realise you are carrying the virus. Note that the face masks we're talking about here are not medical-grade face masks, and we wouldn't advise you to attempt making your own versions of PPE: leave that to the professionals.

The CDC recommends wearing a face mask in places where social distancing is not possible, and many countries around the world are also asking their citizens to wear face masks when out in public, or in enclosed spaces such as supermarkets. In England, the government recommends the use of face masks in "enclosed spaces where social distancing is not always possible and they come into contact with others that they do not normally meet".

Check your country's own guidelines if you're unsure and remember that wearing a face mask or covering doesn't mean you should stop following social distancing measures, or stop washing your hands and practising good hygiene. It's also very important that you put your face mask on and off very carefully, following government guidelines.

With all of that in mind, here are three ways to make your own face mask.

01. How to make a bandana-style face mask 

how to make a face mask

This is the easiest and quickest way to make a face mask

You will need:

A bandana or scarf2 x elastic or rubber bands, or hair tiesA coffee filter, paper towel or kitchen roll (optional)

The easiest method for making your own face mask involves using a bandana or a scarf. Note that if your bandana or scarf is too thin – hold it up to the light to see how much you can see through it, the less you can see, the better – then your face mask won't be as effective. Tightly woven, 100 per cent cotton is best. 

The CDC recommends folding your bandana in half, then folding it again twice – lengthways from both the top and the bottom. At this point, you can also add a square piece of coffee filter, paper towel or kitchen roll to your mask – which you can change.

Then, place your rubber bands or hair ties around your strip of material, and fold the material in towards the middle, tucking the ends into each other if possible.

Surgeon general, Dr Jerome Adam, demonstrates how to do this in the video below. As you can see, this is a very quick and easy method of making your own face mask.

02. How to make a T-shirt face mask

how to make a face mask

You will need:

A T-shirtScissorsCoffee filter or paper towel (optional)

If you have a T-shirt that you don't mind cutting up, then you can easily and quickly make a face mask from it. Note that you don't want to be using really old T-shirts if they have holes in them or are worn through. Ideally, your T-shirt should be 100 per cent cotton and as opaque as possible. 

To start, simply cut the bottom off your T-shirt. The height of the amount of material you need should be the length from the top of your nose to underneath your chin (around 7-8-inches of 17-20cm). It's best to get the measuring tape out if you're unsure, and cut bigger than you think you need so you can trim the excess later (if you cut too small, you'll run into problems). 

You then need to cut into your T-shirt – around 6-7-inches (15-17cm) – to make the ties for your face mask, making a sort of elongated c-shape. Next, cut your ties so that you can retie them around your head. Adjust until you get a snug fit around your nose and chin. If you like, you can add a coffee filter or paper towel to your face mask, and secure it with a safety pin. 

03. How to make a cloth face mask with a sewing machine

how to make a face mask

Make a cloth face mask in just four steps

You will need:

Cotton fabric (10 x 6-inches or roughly 25 x 15 cm)2 x 6-inch (15cm) pieces of elastic or rubber bands, hair ties or strips of clothSewing machine (ideally, you could do this by hand)Needle and threadScissorsPinsJewellery wire, or thin wire (optional)

There are various ways to make a cloth face mask, of varying difficulty. The simplest patterns require just two pieces of cloth and some elastic, or something that you will use as ties. If you want your DIY face mask to stand out, try using bright or patterned fabric – John Lewis has loads of affordable designs in the UK, as does Etsy if you're in the States. 

First, cut your material to around 10 x 6-inches or roughly 25 x 15 cm. If you want to make it really clear which part of your mask is the front and which is the back, use two different materials, this will help you avoid putting on the mask back to front (which is not recommended for hygiene purposes). Next, place your two pieces of fabric on top of each other. You want the pattern that you'd like to be on the 'front' of your mask face down. The piece of material facing up towards you will be the inside of your mask. 

Next, fold over the long sides of the material around 1/4-inch or 0.5-1cm. Pin in place (don't worry too much if you don't have any pins, you can always use a needle or just keep checking that your fabric is held together) and hem. Hem just means folding the edges of your material over and stitching them so that your fabric will not fray and will stay together. 

Once you have hemmed along the length of your face mask, fold over the sides of your face mask around 1/2 an inch (1.5cm), pin and hem the sides too. 

Once you have created your hem, you can thread your elastic or hair ties through the hem you have created. You'll need a needle to do this, or a pin, or safety pin or basically anything that you can use to poke the elastic through your hem – a thin pencil might do the job. You could also add some thin wire into the top hem of your face mask to help you shape it around your nose, jewellery wire works well for this.

With your ties threaded through the sides of your mask, tie your elastic or hair ties in secure knots, and move the knots until they can be tucked inside the hem. You can then adjust your face mask to fit your face, and add some stitches on either end of your face mask to keep your elastic in place.

If you are a seasoned sewer, you can sew the whole thing in one go, turning it as you go, or you can create face mask with a pocket for a filter (see video below). You could even add your elastic in before you hem. The reason beginner sewers shouldn't do this is that it's very easy to catch the elastic in your hem and accidentally sew it down, and that will make it much harder to adjust later. 

Alternatively, you can also follow this face mask sewing tutorial from designer Amanda Riley.

Read more:

Free online resources for creatives stuck at homeThe best streaming services in 2020This self-destructing website needs your help

Collective #616

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/tympanus/~3/o2NaxcLwBU4/

Collective 616 Item Image

Inspirational Website of the Week: FIL – SUMI LIMITED

An impressive dark design with very smooth animations. Our pick this week.

Check it out

Collective 616 Item Image

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Client Feedback with Context

Banish email trails and feedback spreadsheets forever. BugHerd pins feedback and bugs directly to website pages and turns it into actionable tasks.

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Collective 616 Item Image

What does 100% mean in CSS?

Amelia Wattenberger’s guide on what 100% in CSS actually means in its different contexts.

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It’s time to lazy-load offscreen iframes!

Addy Osmani introduces browser-level native lazy-loading for iframes.

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this vs that

What is the difference between some key concepts in front-end development? Find out with this great collection. By Nguyen Huu Phuoc.

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100 Days of 3D Design

Tiantian Xu writes about learning 3D modeling in 100 days.

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Tinykeys

A small, modern library for keybindings by Jamie Kyle.

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macintosh.js

A virtual Apple Macintosh with System 8, running in Electron.

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svelthree

Svelthree is a components library for declarative construction of reactive and reusable scene graphs utilizing a slightly modified three.js source.

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Depth peeling & SS refraction

Mind-blowing demo: screen space refraction through depth peeling in Three.js.

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CS Visualized: CORS

In this part of the “CS Visualized” series, Lydia Hallie explains cross-origin resource sharing in an easy to understand way.

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Perfect Edition

A lightweight, responsive web e-book template by Robin Sloan.

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Teenyicons

A gigantic set of tiny minimal 1px icons made by Anja van Staden.

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window.matchMedia

A great tip by Álvaro Trigo that you might have never heard about!

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Some CSS comics

Some great CSS comics made by Julia Evans.

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Rubber Mesh Swipe Transition

Pull and release the image for a rubbery motion and transition. By Yugam.

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Designing Adaptive Components, Beyond Responsive Breakpoints

Stéphanie Walter writes about designing systems of reusable components that adapt to responsive layouts and more.

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Luckysheet

Luckysheet is an online spreadsheet like Excel that is powerful, simple to configure, and completely open source.

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Webpack: A gentle introduction

A gentle introduction to why Webpack exists, what problems it solves, and how to use it.

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Natively Format JavaScript Dates and Times

Elijah Manor explains how to go about date and time formatting in JavaScript.

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Mandala maker

A supercool mandala generator by Amit Sheen.

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Floating island /w Threejs & GSAP

Awesome 3D scene demo made by Kasper De Bruyne.

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The post Collective #616 appeared first on Codrops.

Introduction to the Jamstack: Build Secure, High-Performance Sites

Original Source: https://www.sitepoint.com/learn-jamstack/?utm_source=rss

Jamstack

Every so often, web development takes a dramatic turn for the better. In this article, we introduce the Jamstack, explaining what it is and why it’s great.

Back in the day, dynamic sites exploded with the LAMP stack. Then the MEAN stack provided a foundation for the next generation of web apps. Now that APIs and reusable components are on the rise, static sites are fashionable again. It’s a “back to basics” of sorts — but not quite.

What Is the Jamstack?

Jamstack logo

Provided: Netlify

The Jamstack is a redefinition of the modern web for faster and more secure websites. These sites scale better and, with the proper toolset, are a lot easier (and more fun) to develop and maintain.

Let’s break up the term:

J stands for JavaScript. JS has come a long way since it was introduced by Netscape in 1995. With reactive and progressive libraries, you can design web apps that behave pretty much like mobile ones.
A stands for APIs. You don’t need to program every single functionality yourself, but can rely on third-party processing for a huge number of tasks.
M stands for Markup. You can reuse components that have already been developed, or create new ones that are a lot easier to maintain.

Isn’t that just buzz?

In a way, yes. The term Jamstack, originally stylized as JAMstack, was coined by the company Netlify as a way of promoting their “all-in-one platform for automating modern web projects.” The principles behind the Jamstack aren’t really new, as web components and APIs have existed for quite some time.

But in very much the same way the term Ajax (asynchronous JavaScript and XML) was coined by another company back in the day — Adaptive Path — and even though the XMLHttpRequest (XHR) API that made Ajax possible also existed for some time, both Ajax and JAMstack were a refreshing revamp of ideas with legitimate uses that were quickly adopted by the community. The hype is well-deserved: this way of working has been a revelation for many developers around the world.

Static sites?

“Static sites” are the antithesis of “dynamic websites”, right? So how to provide rich and dynamic interaction with just plain HTML files? Well, JavaScript.

Continue reading
Introduction to the Jamstack: Build Secure, High-Performance Sites
on SitePoint.

Master graphic design with this $15 bootcamp

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/CreativeBloq/~3/4p000qqqHqQ/master-graphic-design-bootcamp

Graphic design is quickly becoming an in-demand skill for various industries and job positions, and learning how to become a designer doesn't have to be expensive or impossible. With the right tools and guidance, you can train to be the creative you've always dreamed of right from the comfort of your home. Start achieving your goals with the Graphic Design Bootcamp, now only $15. 

Starting with the essentials, you'll begin the crash course training bundle by getting familiar with the industry-leading programs included in Adobe's Creative Cloud. With an intro into each program application, you'll get an understanding of each app and acquire valuable tips from the pros for getting your programs started with ease. For more Adobe lessons, try our pick of the best Photoshop tutorials and top Illustrator tutorials. 

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Dive into hands-on projects

Once you are organised and comfortable with your desktop setup, you'll dive deep into hands-on projects that allow you to put what you learn into real-world practice. Led by creative director and designer Derrick Mitchell, each project will guide you through essential design principles and step-by-step introductions to Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign software interfaces. You'll learn the ins and outs of design techniques on each platform, and cover essential tools used by graphic designers of all levels.

With 65 lectures included, you'll be exposed to projects with downloadable project files for both digital and print mediums, plus learn best practices and techniques for each along the way. Projects on logo design, compositing, business card creation, editorial design, and more will get you started producing work that will help launch your career or merely help brush up your skills. 

Not only will you have work to show from the course, but you'll learn how to get started creating a portfolio to display your design work. Access to an exclusive private Facebook group will allow you to connect with other students for sharing and critiquing projects. This opportunity will enable you to start getting comfortable with showcasing your work and getting feedback – a variable that every graphic designer must face. Certification of completion is also included upon finishing your projects, adding valuable credentials to your résumé, and future job interviews.

While usually priced at over $100, this crash course brings you everything you need to jumpstart your graphic design career for only $15 – that's 88 per cent off! Add valuable skills and credibility to your ongoing creative portfolio and continue learning today with a little help from the pros. 

*Prices subject to change. Software not included.

Read more: 

The best laptops for graphic design in 2020Graphic design history: 25 landmark design events33 must-read graphic design books

Deno Module System: A Beginner’s Guide

Original Source: https://www.sitepoint.com/deno-module-system-a-beginners-guide/?utm_source=rss

Deno Modules

Learn about the Deno module system – the biggest workflow change you’ll encounter if you’re coming from Node.js. Find out how it works and how to use it, how to make use of Node.js packages in Deno, and more.

Node.js is a JavaScript runtime based on Chrome’s V8 engine, developed by Ryan Dahl, and released in 2009.

Deno is a JavaScript runtime based on Chrome’s V8 engine, developed by Ryan Dahl, and released in 2020. It was created with the benefit of a decade’s worth of hindsight. That doesn’t necessarily make it a sequel or superior to Node.js, but it deviates from that path.

See also:

Introduction to Deno: A Secure JavaScript & TypeScript Runtime
Node.js vs Deno: What You Need to Know

The headline differences: Deno natively supports TypeScript, security, testing, and browser APIs. Module handling receives less attention, but it’s possibly the largest change to how you create JavaScript applications. Before discussing Deno, let me take you back to a simpler time…

Node.js Modules

JavaScript didn’t have a standard module system in 2009. This was partly because of its browser heritage and ES6 / ES2015 was several years away.

It would have been inconceivable for Node.js not to provide modules, so it adopted CommonJS from a choice of community workarounds. This led to the development of the Node Package Manager, or npm, which allowed developers to easily search, use, and publish their own JavaScript modules.

npm usage grew exponentially. It’s become the most popular package manager ever devised and, by mid-2020, hosts almost 1.5 million modules with more than 800 new ones published every day (source: modulecounts.com).

Deno Modules

Deno opts for ES2015 Modules which you import from an absolute or relative URL:

import { something } from ‘https://somewhere.com/somehow.js’;

The script at that URL must export functions or other values accordingly, e.g.

export function something() {
console.log(‘something was executed’);
}

Deno uses an identical module system to that implemented in modern web browsers.

Node.js also supports ES2015 modules … but it’s complicated and remains experimental. CommonJS and ES2015 modules look similar, but work in different ways:

Continue reading
Deno Module System: A Beginner’s Guide
on SitePoint.