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90% Off: Get The Complete VR Development Bundle for Only $34

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Designrfix/~3/4HGpf6wyHBw/complete-vr-development-bundle

Virtual reality isn’t entirely new. In fact, this concept was first introduced in 1995. Yes, 22 years ago. If I remember it clearly, there was a television show called “VR5”, which focused on virtual reality and the entire cyber experience. Although VR didn’t quite pick up at that time, it certainly has now. If you’re […]

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Caching Smartly In The Age Of Gutenberg

Original Source: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2018/12/caching-smartly-gutenberg/

Caching Smartly In The Age Of Gutenberg

Caching Smartly In The Age Of Gutenberg

Leonardo Losoviz

2018-12-05T13:00:15+01:00
2018-12-05T19:37:50+00:00

Caching is needed for speeding up a site: instead of having the server dynamically create the HTML output for each request, it can create the HTML only after it is requested the first time, cache it, and serve the cached version from then on. Caching delivers a faster response, and frees up resources in the server. When optimizing the speed of our sites from the server side, caching ranks among the most critical tasks to get right.

When generating the HTML output for the page, if it contains code with user state, such as printing a welcome message “Hello {{User name}}!” for the logged in user, then the page cannot be cached. Otherwise, if Peter visits the site first, and the HTML output is cached, all users would then be welcomed with “Hello Peter!”

Hence, caching plugins, such as those available for WordPress, will generally offer to disable caching when the user is logged in, as shown below for plugin WP Super Cache:

Disabled caching for known users in WP Super Cache

WP Super Cache recommends to disable caching for logged in users. (Large preview)

Disabling caching for logged in users is undesirable and should be avoided, because even if the amount of HTML code with user state is minimal compared to the static content in the page, still nothing will be cached. The reason is that the entity to be cached is the page, and not the particular pieces of HTML code within the page, so by including a single line of code which cannot be cached, then nothing will be cached. It is an all-or-nothing situation.

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To address this, we can architect our application to avoid rendering HTML code with user state on the server-side, and render it on the client-side only, after fetching its required data through an API (often based on REST or GraphQL). By removing user state from code rendered on the server, that page can then be cached, even if the user is logged in.

In this article, we will explore the following issues:

How do we identify those sections of code that require user state, isolate them from the page, and make them be rendered on the client-side only?
How can it be implemented for WordPress sites through Gutenberg?

Gutenberg Is Bringing Components To WordPress

As I explained in my previous article Implications of thinking in blocks instead of blobs, Gutenberg is a JavaScript-based editor for WordPress (more specifically, it is a React-based editor, encapsulating the React libraries behind the global wp object), slated for release in either November 2018 or January 2019. Through its drag-and-drop interface, Gutenberg will utterly transform the experience of creating content for WordPress and, at some later stage in the future, the process of building sites, switching from the current creation of a page through templates (header.php, index.php, sidebar.php, footer.php), and the content of the page through a single blob of HTML code, to creating components to be placed anywhere on the page, which can control their own logic, load their own data, and self-render.

To appreciate the upcoming change visually, WordPress is moving from this:

The page contains templates with HTML code

Currently pages are built through PHP templates. (Large preview)

To this:

The page contains autonomous components

In the near future, pages will be built by placing self-rendering components in them. (Large preview)

Even though Gutenberg as a site builder is not ready yet, we can already think in terms of components when designing the architecture of our site. As for the topic of this article, architecting our application using components as the unit for building the page can help implement an enhanced caching strategy, as we shall see below.

Evaluating The Relationship Between Pages And Components

As mentioned earlier, the entity being cached is the page. Hence, we need to evaluate how components will be placed on the page as to maximize the page’s cacheability. Based on their dependence on user state, we can broadly categorize pages into the following 3 groups:

Pages without any user state, such as “Who we are” page.
Pages with bits and pieces of user state, such as the homepage when welcoming the user (“Welcome Peter!”), or an archive page with a list of posts, showing a “Like” button under each post which is painted blue if the logged in user has liked that post.
Pages naturally with user state, in which content depends directly from the logged in user, such as “My posts” of “Edit my profile” pages.

Components, on the other side, can simply be categorized as requiring user state or not. Because the architecture considers the component as the unit for building the page, the component has the faculty of knowing if it requires user state or not. Hence, a <WelcomeUser /> component, which renders “Welcome Peter!”, knows it requires user state, while a <WhoWeAre /> component knows that it does not.

Next, we need to place components on the page, and depending on the combination of page and component requiring user state or not, we can establish a proper strategy for caching the page and for rendering content to the user as soon as possible. We have the following cases:

1. Pages Without Any User State

These can be cached with no issues.

Page is cached => It can’t access user state.
Components, none of them requiring user state, are rendered in the server.

Page without user state

A page without user state can only contain components without user state. (Large preview)

2. Pages With Bits And Pieces Of User State

We could make the page either require user state or not. If we make the page require user state, then it cannot be cached, which is a wasted opportunity when most of the content in the page is static. Hence, we’d rather make the page not require user state, and those components requiring user state which are placed on the page, such as <WelcomeUser /> on the homepage, are made lazy-load: the server-side renders an empty shell, and the component is rendered instead in the client-side, after getting its data from an API.

Following this approach, all static content in the page will be rendered immediately through server-side rendering (SSR), and those bits and pieces with user state after some delay through client-side rendering (CSR).

Page is cached => It can’t access user state.
Components not requiring user state are rendered in the server.
Components requiring user state are rendered in the client.

Page with bits of user state

A page with bits of user state contains CSR components with user state, and SSR components without user state. (Large preview)

3. Pages Naturally With User State

If the library or framework only enables client-side rendering, then we must follow the same approach as with #2: do not make the page require user state, and add a component, such as <MyPosts />, to self-render in the client.

However, since the main objective of the page is to show user content, making the user wait for this content to be loaded on a 2nd stage is not ideal. Let’s see this with an example: a user who has not logged in yet accesses page “Edit my profile”. If the site renders the content in the server, since the user is not logged in the server will immediately redirect to the login page. Instead, if the content is rendered in the client through an API, the user will first be presented a loading message, and only after the response from the API is back will the user be redirected to the login page, making the experience slower.

Hence, we are better off using a library or framework that supports server-side rendering, and we make the page require user state (making it non-cacheable):

Page is not cached => It can access user state.
Components, both requiring and not requiring user state, are rendered in the server.

Page with user state

A page with user state contains SSR components both with and without user state. (Large preview)

From this strategy and all the combinations it produces, deciding if a component must be rendered server or client-side simply boils down to the following pseudo-code:

if (component requires user state and page can’t access user state) {
render component in client
}
else {
render component in server
}

This strategy allows to attain our objective: implemented for all pages in the site, for all components placed in each page, and configuring the site to not cache pages which access the user state, we can then avoid disabling caching any page whenever the user is logged in.

Rendering Components Client/Server-Side Through Gutenberg

In Gutenberg, those components which can be embedded on the page are called “blocks” (or also Gutenblocks). Gutenberg supports two types of blocks, static and dynamic:

Static blocks produce their HTML code already in the client (when the user is interacting with the editor) and save it inside the post content. Hence, they are client-side JavaScript-based blocks.
Dynamic blocks, on the other hand, are those which can change their content dynamically, such as a latest posts block, so they cannot save the HTML output inside the post content. Hence, in addition to creating their HTML code on the client-side, they must also produce it from the server on runtime through a PHP function (which is defined under parameter render_callback when registering the block in the backend through function register_block_type.)

Because HTML code with user state cannot be saved in the post’s content, a block dealing with user state will necessarily be a dynamic block. In summary, through dynamic blocks we can produce the HTML for a component both in the server and client-side, enabling to implement our optimized caching strategy. The previous pseudo-code, when using Gutenberg, will look like this:

if (block requires user state and page can’t access user state) {
render block in client through JavaScript
}
else {
render (dynamic) block in server through PHP code
}

Unfortunately, implementing the dual client/server-side functionality doesn’t come without hardship: Gutenberg’s SSR is not isomorphic, ie it does not allow a single codebase to produce the output for both client and server-side code. Hence, developers would need to maintain 2 codebases, one in PHP and one in JavaScript, which is far from optimal.

Gutenberg also implements a <ServerSideRender /> component, however it advices against using it: this component was not thought for improving the speed of the site and rendering an immediate response to the user, but for providing compatibility with legacy code, such as shortcodes.

As it is explained in the documentation:

“ServerSideRender should be regarded as a fallback or legacy mechanism, it is not appropriate for developing new features against.

“New blocks should be built in conjunction with any necessary REST API endpoints, so that JavaScript can be used for rendering client-side in the edit function. This gives the best user experience, instead of relying on using the PHP render_callback. The logic necessary for rendering should be included in the endpoint, so that both the client-side JavaScript and server-side PHP logic should require a minimal amount of differences.”

As a result, when building our sites, we will need to decide if to implement SSR, which boosts the site’s speed by enabling an optimal caching experience and by providing an immediate response to the user when loading the page, but which comes at the cost of maintaining 2 codebases. Depending on the context, it may be worth it or not.

Configuring What Pages Require User State

Pages requiring (or accessing) user state will be made non-cacheable, while all other pages will be cacheable. Hence, we need to identify which pages require user state. Please notice that this applies only to pages, and not to REST endpoints, since the goal is to render the component already in the server when accessing the page, and calling the WP REST API’s endpoints implies getting the data for rendering the component in the client. Hence, from the perspective our our caching strategy, we can assume all REST endpoints will require user state, and so they don’t need to be cached.

To identifying which pages require user state, we simply create a function get_pages_with_user_state, like this:

function get_pages_with_user_state() {

return apply_filters(
‘get_pages_with_user_state’,
array()
);
}

Upon which we implement hooks with the corresponding pages, like this:

// ID of the pages, retrieved from the WordPress admin
define (‘MYPOSTS_PAGEID’, 5);
define (‘ADDPOST_PAGEID’, 8);

add_filter(‘get_pages_with_user_state’, ‘get_pages_with_user_state_impl’);
function get_pages_with_user_state_impl($pages) {

$pages[] = MYPOSTS_PAGEID;

// “Add Post” may not require user state!
// $pages[] = ADDPOST_PAGEID;

return $pages;
}

Please notice how we may not need to add user state for page “Add Post” (making this page cacheable), even though this page requires to validate that the user is logged in when submitting a form to create content on the site. This is because the “Add Post” page may simply display an empty form, requiring no user state whatsoever. Then, submitting the form will be a POST operation, which cannot be cached in any case (only GET requests are cached).

Disabling Caching Of Pages With User State In WP Super Cache

Finally, we configure our application to disable caching for those pages which require user state (and cache everything else.) We will do this for plugin WP Super Cache, by blacklisting the URIs of those pages in the plugin settings page:

WP Super Cache settings to disable caching for blacklisted strings

We can disable caching URLs containing specific strings in WP Super Cache. (Large preview)

What we need to do is create a script that obtains the paths for all pages with user state, and saves it in the corresponding input field. This script can then be invoked manually, or automatically as part of the application’s deployment process.

First we obtain all the URIs for the pages with user state:

function get_rejected_strings() {

$rejected_strings = array();
$pages_with_user_state = get_pages_with_user_state();
foreach ($pages_with_user_state as $page) {

// Calculate the URI for that page to the list of rejected strings
$path = substr(get_permalink($page), strlen(home_url()));
$rejected_strings[] = $path;
}

return $rejected_strings;
}

And then, we must add the rejected strings into WP Super Cache’s configuration file, located in wp-content/wp-cache-config.php, updating the value of entry $cache_rejected_uri with our list of paths:

function set_rejected_strings_in_wp_super_cache() {

if ($rejected_strings = get_rejected_strings()) {

// Keep the original values in
$rejected_strings = array_merge(
array(‘wp-.*\\.php’, ‘index\\.php’),
$rejected_strings
);

global $wp_cache_config_file;
$cache_rejected_uri = “array(‘”.implode(“‘, ‘”, $rejected_strings).”‘)”;
wp_cache_replace_line(‘^ *$cache_rejected_uri’, “$cache_rejected_uri = ” . $cache_rejected_uri . “;”, $wp_cache_config_file);
}
}

Upon execution of function set_rejected_strings_in_wp_super_cache, the settings will be updated with the new rejected strings:

WP Super Cache settings to disable caching blacklisted strings

Blacklisting the paths from pages accessing user state in WP Super Cache. (Large preview)

Finally, because we are now able to disable caching for the specific pages that require user state, there is no need to disable caching for logged in users anymore:

Disabled caching for known users in WP Super Cache

No need to disable caching for logged in users anymore! (Large preview)

That’s it!

Conclusion

In this article, we explored a way to enhance our site’s caching — mainly aimed at enabling caching on the site even when the users are logged in. The strategy relies on disabling caching only for those pages which require user state, and on using components which can decide if to be rendered on the client or on the server-side, depending on the page accessing the user state or not.

As a general concept, the strategy can be implemented on any architecture that supports server-side rendering of components. In particular, we analyzed how it can be implemented for WordPress sites through Gutenberg, advising to assess if it is worth the trouble of maintaining two codebases, one in PHP for the server-side code, and one in JavaScript for the client-side code.

Finally, we explained that the solution can be integrated into the caching plugin through a custom script to automatically produce the list of pages to avoid caching, and produced the code for plugin WP Super Cache.

After implementing this strategy to my site, it doesn’t matter anymore if visitors are logged in or not. They will always access a cached version of the homepage, providing a faster response and a better user experience.

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(rb, ra, yk, il)

Get the eBook Self-Publishing Bundle for Only $25

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Designrfix/~3/cafF0uGeRd8/ebook-self-publishing-bundle-sale

Decades ago, authors who were interested in getting their books published wool have to talk to different publishers, send them their manuscript, and then hope that someone would appreciate their work. Today, however, you don’t need a publisher to get your books out there. In fact, authors now have the option to publish their own […]

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It’s Beginning To Look A Lot Like&hellip; December (2018 Wallpapers Edition)

Original Source: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2018/11/desktop-wallpaper-calendars-december-2018/

It’s Beginning To Look A Lot Like&hellip; December (2018 Wallpapers Edition)

It’s Beginning To Look A Lot Like&hellip; December (2018 Wallpapers Edition)

Cosima Mielke

2018-11-30T09:01:00+01:00
2018-12-04T17:38:33+00:00

What are you looking forward to in December? Spending time with family and friends during the holidays, watching the birds gather in your snowy backyard, or celebrating “Bathtub Party Day” maybe? These are just some of the things that inspired artists and designers to create their desktop wallpapers this month.

All wallpapers in this post come in versions with and without a calendar for December 2018 and can be downloaded for free — as it has been our monthly tradition since more than nine years already. To cater for an extra bit of December joy, we also collected some wallpaper favorites from past years at the end of the post. Happy December and happy holidays!

Further Reading on SmashingMag:

60 Beautiful Christmas Photoshop Tutorials
Winter- And Holiday-Inspired Icon Sets
How To Draw A Cartoon In Illustrator
How To Create Dramatic Vector Illustrations

Please note that:

All images can be clicked on and lead to the preview of the wallpaper,
You can feature your work in our magazine by taking part in our Desktop Wallpaper Calendar series. We are regularly looking for creative designers and artists to be featured on Smashing Magazine. Are you one of them?

Meet Smashing Book 6 — our brand new book focused on real challenges and real front-end solutions in the real world: from design systems and accessible single-page apps to CSS Custom Properties, CSS Grid, Service Workers, performance, AR/VR and responsive art direction. With Marcy Sutton, Yoav Weiss, Lyza D. Gardner, Laura Elizabeth and many others.

Table of Contents →

Christmas Wreath

“Everyone is in the mood for Christmas when December starts. Therefore I made this Christmas wreath inspired wallpaper. Enjoy December and Merry Christmas to all!” — Designed by Melissa Bogemans from Belgium.

Christmas Wreath

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Cardinals In Snowfall

“During Christmas season, in the cold, colorless days of winter, Cardinal birds are seen as symbols of faith and warmth! In the part of America I live in, there is snowfall every December. While the snow is falling, I can see gorgeous Cardinals flying in and out of my patio. The intriguing color palette of the bright red of the Cardinals, the white of the flurries and the brown/black of dry twigs and fallen leaves on the snow-laden ground, fascinates me a lot, and inspired me to create this quaint and sweet, hand-illustrated surface pattern design as I wait for the December 2018 snowfall in my town!” — Designed by Gyaneshwari Dave from the United States.

Cardinals In Snowfall

preview
with calendar: 640×960, 768×1024, 1280×720, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1920×1080, 2560×1440
without calendar: 640×960, 768×1024, 1280×720, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1920×1080, 2560×1440

Cozy

“December is all about coziness and warmth. Days are getting darker, shorter and colder. So a nice cup of hot cocoa just warms me up.” — Designed by Hazuki Sato from Belgium.

Cosy

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 960×560, 1024×768, 1280×960, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 960×560, 1024×768, 1280×960, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 2560×1440

Sweet Snowy Tenderness

“You know that warm feeling when you get to spend cold winter days in a snug, homey, relaxed atmosphere? Oh, yes, we love it too! It is the sentiment we set our hearts on for the holiday season, and this sweet snowy tenderness is for all of us who adore watching the snowfall from our windows. Isn’t it romantic?” — Designed by PopArt Studio from Serbia.

Sweet Snowy Tenderness

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

’Tis The Season Of Snow

“The tiny flakes of snow have just begun to shower and we know it’s the start of the merry hour! Someone is all set to cram his sleigh with boxes of love as kids wait for their dear Santa to show up! Rightly said, ’tis the season of snow, surprise and lots and lots of fun! Merry Christmas!” — Designed by Sweans Technologies from London.

’Tis The Season Of Snow

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Bathtub Party Day

“December 5th is also known as Bathtub Party Day, which is why I wanted to visualize what celebrating this day could look like.” — Designed by Jonas Vanhamme from Belgium.

Bathtub Party Day

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1400×1050, 1600×1200, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440, 2560×1600
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1400×1050, 1600×1200, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440, 2560×1600

Cold Days, Warm Feelings

“Everything that reminds me of the cold days of December. I’ve tried to put everything in one illustration, the snow, hot coffee, mountains, snowman. Also my illustration is blue, it’s a cold color, so this give the illustration more of a winter effect.” — Designed by Dennis van den Heuvel from Belgium.

Cold Days, Warm Feelings

preview
with calendar: 800×480, 1024×768, 1280×960, 1680×1200, 1920×1440
without calendar: 800×480, 1024×768, 1280×960, 1680×1200, 1920×1440

Oh Deer, It’s Cold!

“December brings more than Christmas only. It brings Winter. It brings the cold.” — Designed by Ellen Theuwen from Belgium.

Oh Deer, It’s Cold!

preview
with calendar: 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Portland Snow Globe

Designed by Mad Fish Digital from the USA.

Portland Snow Globe

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 1024×1024, 1280×720, 1680×1200, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 1024×1024, 1280×720, 1680×1200, 2560×1440

Another Christmas

“‘Christmas waves a magic wand over this world, and behold, everything is softer and more beautiful.’ (Norman Vincent Peale)” — Designed by Suman Sil from India.

Another Christmas

preview
with calendar: 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

A December To Remember

“Of all the months of the year, there is not a month so welcome to the young or so full of happy associations as this last month of the year. A month of giving, celebrations, and holidays. Christmas month is here. Make this last month of the year special for you and the ones around you.” — Designed by Procurement Software from India.

A December To Remember

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

December Music

“Have you ever noticed how people have characteristic (or weird) poses playing instruments? It was my inspiration for drawing very simple and funny stick-figure musicians. Over the years I have drawn everything from violinists to pipa players (Chinese instrument) and from electric guitarists to tubaists. I never get bored of drawing new instrumentalists, ensembles or, in this case, a Christmas band. I wish you a very happy December with lots of music!” — Designed by Franke Margrete from The Netherlands.

December Music

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 360×480, 376×668, 768×1024, 1024×1024, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1366×1050, 1440×900, 1536×864, 1600×900, 1920×1080, 1920×1440, 2560×1440, 2560×1600, 3840×2160, 5120×2880
without calendar: 320×480, 360×480, 376×668, 768×1024, 1024×1024, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1366×1050, 1440×900, 1536×864, 1600×900, 1920×1080, 1920×1440, 2560×1440, 2560×1600, 3840×2160, 5120×2880

The Mountains Shout Freedom

“December is that time of the year where snows starts to fall. It’s from this moment that we can go skiing and snowboarding again. It’s the best time of the year.” — Designed by Jasper Bogaert from Belgium.

The Mountains Shout Freedom

preview
with calendar: 960×540, 1440×810, 1920×1080, 2880×1620, 3840×2160, 5760×3240
without calendar: 960×540, 1440×810, 1920×1080, 2880×1620, 3840×2160, 5760×3240

Meeeh

“December is when winter begins, so I decided to go for some nice, cold, pastel colors and a wintery scenario. The ram is a family-related symbol and it’s cute, so I named it Meeeh.” — Designed by Ana Matos from Portugal.

Meeeh

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 800×600, 1280×1024, 1440×900, 1680×1050, 1920×1080, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 800×600, 1280×1024, 1440×900, 1680×1050, 1920×1080, 2560×1440

Snow & Flake

“December always reminds me of snow and being with other people. That’s why I created two snowflakes Snow & Flake who are best buddies and love being with each other during winter time.” — Designed by Ian De Lantsheer from Belgium.

Snow & Flake

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Midnight Aurora

“I was inspired by beautiful images of the Aurora that I saw on the internet.” — Designed by Wannes Verboven from Belgium.

Midnight Aurora

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Enlightened By The Christmas Spirit

“Christmas is the most wonderful time of the year! Once we’ve had our fill of turkey and welcomed the holiday season, we’re constantly encouraged to get into the spirit of the festive season.” — Designed by Mobile App Development from India.

Enlightened By The Christmas Spirit

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with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

All Of Them Lights

“I created this design in honour of the 9th of December, the day of lights.” — Designed by Mathias Geerts from Belgium.

All Of Them Lights

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Brrrr…!

Designed by Oumayma Jamali from Belgium.

Brrrr...!

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 800×600, 1600×1200, 1920×1080, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 800×600, 1600×1200, 1920×1080, 2560×1440

Christmas House

Designed by Antun Hiršman from Croatia.

Christmas House

preview
with calendar: 800×600, 1280×720, 1440×900, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 800×600, 1280×720, 1440×900, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Christmas December

Designed by Think 360 Studio from India.

Christmas December

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with calendar: 1366×768, 1440×900, 1920×1080, 2560×1440
without calendar: 1366×768, 1440×900, 1920×1080, 2560×1440

Separate Holidays

“My parents are divorced so I don’t really like the holidays because it feels like I always have to choose between my mum and dad.” — Designed by Micheline Van Looveren from Belgium.

Separate Holidays

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Human Rights Month

“December is Human Rights Month, so I decided to design a wallpaper for this special month.” — Designed by Jonas Vanhamme from Belgium.

Human Rights Month

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1400×1050, 1600×1200, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440, 2560×1600
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1400×1050, 1600×1200, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440, 2560×1600

Winter Morning

“Early walks in the fields when the owls still sit on the fences and stare funny at you.” — Designed by Bo Dockx from Belgium.

Winter Morning

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Homeless Christmas

“December automatically brings to mind the Christmas spirit, the smell of delicious food, and the joy of opening beautiful presents. A couple of years ago I volunteered in a homeless shelter for a while. I even spent New Years’ Eve at the shelter. And ever since, Christmas also reminds me that a lot of others are much less fortunate than me…” — Designed by Kim Haesen from Belgium.

Homeless Christmas

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with calendar: 1024×1024, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 1024×1024, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Christmas Feelings

Designed by Lieselotte Philips from Belgium.

Christmas Feelings

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Merry Christmas

“‘Christmas gives us the opportunity to pause and reflect on the important things around us.’ (David Cameron)” — Designed by Pinki Ghosh Dastidar from India.

Merry Christmas

preview
with calendar: 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

International Tea Day

“December 15 is International Tea Day, so I thought to design a cup of tea, which also represents the cold weather during the winter.” — Designed by Hannah De Wachter from Belgium.

International Tea Day

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 800×600, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×1024, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1920×1080, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 800×600, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×1024, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1920×1080, 2560×1440

Money Doesn’t Grow On Trees

“I wanted to emphasize people who do not have enough money to celebrate Christmas like everyone else in the world.” — Designed by Angelique Buijzen from Belgium.

Money Doesn’t Grow On Trees

preview
with calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Explore The World

“‘We must go beyond textbooks, go out into the bypaths and untrodden depths of the wilderness and travel and explore and tell the world the glories of our journey.’ (John Hope Franklin)” — Designed by Dipanjan Karmakar from India.

Explore The World

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with calendar: 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1680×1050, 1920×1080
without calendar: 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1680×1050, 1920×1080

Oldies But Goodies

Ready for a trip back in time? Here’s a collection of December goodies from past years that are too good to be forgotten. Please note that these wallpapers don’t come with a calendar.

’Tis The Season To Be Happy

Designed by Tazi from Australia.

'Tis The Season To Be Happy

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without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×960, 1600×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Christmas Cookies

“Christmas is coming and a great way to share our love is by baking cookies.” — Designed by Maria Keller from Mexico.

Christmas Cookies

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without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 640×1136, 750×1334, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1242×2208, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440, 2880×1800

The House On The River Drina

“Since we often yearn for a peaceful and quiet place to work, we have found inspiration in the famous house on the River Drina in Bajina Bašta, Serbia. Wouldn’t it be great being in nature, away from the civilization, swaying in the wind and listening to the waves of the river smashing your house, having no neighbors to bother you? Not sure about the Internet, though…” — Designed by PopArt Studio from Serbia.

Christmas Wallpaper — The House On The River Drina

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without calendar: 640×480, 800×600, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Christmas Woodland

Designed by Mel Armstrong from Australia.

Christmas Woodland

preview
without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Getting Hygge

“There’s no more special time for a fire than in the winter. Cozy blankets, warm beverages, and good company can make all the difference when the sun goes down. We’re all looking forward to generating some hygge this winter, so snuggle up and make some memories.” — Designed by The Hannon Group from Washington D.C.

Getting Hygge

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without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1280×960, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Joy To The World

“Joy to the world, all the boys and girls now, joy to the fishes in the deep blue sea, joy to you and me.” — Designed by Morgan Newnham from Boulder, Colorado.

Joy To The World

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without calendar: 320×480, 640×480, 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

Winter Wonderland

“‘Winter is the time for comfort, for good food and warmth, for the touch of a friendly hand and for a talk beside the fire: it is the time for home.’ (Edith Sitwell) — Designed by Dipanjan Karmakar from India.

Christmas Wallpaper — Winter Wonderland

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without calendar: 1280×720, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

December Through Different Eyes

“As a Belgian, December reminds me of snow, cosiness, winter, lights and so on. However, in the Southern Hemisphere it is summer at this time. With my illustration I wanted to show the different perspectives on December. I wish you all a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!” — Designed by Jo Smets from Belgium.

Christmas Wallpaper — December Through Different Eyes

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without calendar: 320×480, 800×480, 1280×800, 1280×1024, 1920×1080, 2560×1440

’Tis The Season (To Drink Eggnog)

“There’s nothing better than a tall glass of Golden Eggnog while sitting by the Christmas tree. Let’s celebrate the only time of year this nectar of the gods graces our lips.” — Designed by Jonathan Shears from Connecticut, USA.

’Tis The Season (To Drink Eggnog)

preview
without calendar: 1024×768, 1152×864, 1280×960, 1440×1080, 1680×1260, 1920×1440, 2048×1536, 2560×1440

Gifts Lover

Designed by Elise Vanoorbeek from Belgium.

Gifts Lover

preview
without calendar: 800×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1152×864, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440

The Southern Hemisphere Is Calling

“Santa’s tired of winter (and the North Pole) and is flying to the South part of the globe to relax a little bit. He deserves a little vacation, don’t you think?” — Designed by Ricardo Gimenes from Sweden.

The Southern Hemisphere Is Calling

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without calendar: 320×480, 640×960, 1024×768, 1024×1024, 1280×800, 1280×960, 1280×1024, 1366×768, 1400×1050, 1440×900, 1600×1050, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1680×1200, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 1920×1440, 2560×1440, 2880×1800

Have A Minimal Christmas

“My brother-in-law has been on a design buzzword kick where he calls everything minimal, to the point where he wishes people, “Have a minimal day!” I made this graphic as a poster for him.” — Designed by Danny Gugger from Madison, Wisconsin, USA.

Have a Minimal Christmas

preview
without calendar: 750×1334, 1080×1920, 1136×640, 1280×960, 1920×1080, 2560×1440, 5210×2880

Christmas Time!

Designed by Sofie Keirsmaekers from Belgium.

Christmas time!

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without calendar: 320×480, 1024×1024, 1280×1024, 1440×900, 1920×1200, 2560×1440

Happy Holidays

Designed by Bogdan Negrescu from the United States.

Happy Holidays

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without calendar: 320×480, 1024×768, 1280×800, 1280×1024, 1440×900, 1920×1080, 2560×1440

It’s In The Little Things

Designed by Thaïs Lenglez from Belgium.

It's in the little things

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without calendar: 640×480, 800×600, 1024×768, 1280×1024, 1440×900, 1600×1200, 1680×1050, 1920×1080, 1920×1200, 2560×1440

Join In Next Month!

Please note that we respect and carefully consider the ideas and motivation behind each and every artist’s work. This is why we give all artists the full freedom to explore their creativity and express emotions and experience throughout their works. This is also why the themes of the wallpapers weren’t anyhow influenced by us, but rather designed from scratch by the artists themselves.

Thank you to all designers for their participation. Join in next month!

Web Design And Development Advent Roundup For 2018

Original Source: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2018/12/web-design-development-advent-roundup-2018/

Web Design And Development Advent Roundup For 2018

Web Design And Development Advent Roundup For 2018

Rachel Andrew

2018-12-03T16:30:30+02:00
2018-12-04T17:38:33+00:00

In the run-up to Christmas, there is a tradition across the web design and development community to produce advent calendars, typically with a new article or resource for each day of December. In this article, I have rounded up all those that I have found to be running this year, along with RSS feeds where they can be located, and Twitter accounts to make it easier to follow along.

Q: What’s 14 years old and not at all in a last minute panic?

— 24 ways (@24ways) November 27, 2018

It is a lot of work to publish an article every day — as we well know here at Smashing — and we have a whole team here to help. However, the majority of the calendars published here are true community efforts, often with the bulk of the work falling to an individual or tiny team, with no budget to pay authors and editors. So, please join us in supporting these efforts, share the articles that you enjoyed reading, and join the discussions respectfully. Whether you celebrate Christmas or not, you can certainly learn a lot of new things over the next 24 days.

Perl Advent

Perl AdventPerl Advent has been running since 2000 and is the longest running web advent calendar that I know of. Now old enough to enjoy a festive sherry (in Europe at least), they are back for 2018 for 24 merry days of Perl.

RSS Feed
@perladvent on Twitter

24 Ways

24 WaysI have to admit a little bias in this subject as 24 Ways is the calendar started by my husband, business partner and fellow Smashing Magazine editor, Drew McLellan. 24 Ways has been running since 2005, when Drew had the idea to post a new article each day of December until Christmas. I don’t think either of us expected that on the 30th November 2018, Drew would still be staying up until midnight to check that the first article went live!

RSS Feed
@24ways on Twitter

Web forms are such an important part of the web, but we design them poorly all the time. The brand new Form Design Patterns book is our new practical guide for people who design, prototype and build all sorts of forms for digital services, products and websites. The eBook is free for Smashing Members.

Check the table of contents ↬

Form Design Patterns — a practical guide for anyone who needs to design and code web forms

PerfPlanet Calendar

Performance CalendarEver since 2009, the Performance Calendar has been helping us to speed up the web. It is up again for the 10th year in a row and is maintained by Sergey Chernyshev.

RSS Feed
@perfplanet on Twitter

24 Jours De Web

24 Jours De WebNext on my list is the French language calendar, 24 Jours De Web. Their first year of publication was 2012, and they are supporting the charity L’Auberge des Migrants, asking readers to donate to help refugees in Calais and the North of France, providing material and food aid, support and advocacy.

RSS Feed
@24joursdeweb on Twitter

Christmas XP

Christmas XPThe Christmas XP calendar is a little different. Rather than an article each day, they bring us a WebGL experiment. They have been bringing us experiments in WebGL since 2012.

@christmasxp on Twitter
@christmasxp on Twitter

AWS Advent

AWS AdventIf you would like to brush up on your AWS skills then the AWS Advent calendar promises “a yearly exploration of AWS in 24 parts”. You’ll find a wide range of articles on security, deployment strategy and general tips and techniques to be aware of when using Amazon Web Services.

RSS Feed
AWSAdvent on Twitter

24 Days In December

24 Days In DecemberIf PHP is your language of choice then you can look forward to 24 days of PHP articles over at 24 Days in December. They began publishing in 2015, when Andreas Heigl realized that he missed Web Advent who had stopped publishing in 2012.

In his wrap-up post after the initial season Andreas wrote:

“I came to realize that I missed the phpadvent/webadvent the last years. And wouldn’t it be great to have a read about something PHP-related for the first 24 Days in December? Even for those people that are not Christian, the time before Christmas has to be a special time. And if it’s only due to the commercials and ads what to present.

So I would wait and see whether someone would arrange something.

But wait! When everyone thinks someone should do something, no-one will do anything.”

I’m happy that the community effort started by Andreas, when he realized that he would need to be the person who did something, is back for another year.

RSS Feed
@24DaysInDec on Twitter

24 Pull Requests

24 Pull RequestsThe 24 Pull Requests calendar is a little different. It began in 2012 with the idea that contributors should, “Send 24 pull requests between December 1st and December 24th.” The idea being that this would be 24 gifts to the open-source community from every contributor. Since the project began, 19,859 have contributed (at the time of writing).

It’s a brilliant idea, and I really love their updated policy for 2018. Recognizing that making Pull Requests is only one way that people contribute to open source, the site has widened the scope of contributions. You can make a Pull Request as before if this is how you contribute. However, you can also complete a form to track your non-PR contribution. Perhaps you wrote a tutorial, ran a meetup, mentored someone — these things are all important contributions too. Read the updated contribution policy for 2018 and join in!

@24PullRequests on Twitter
Chat with people who are taking part this year on Gitter

UXmas

UXmasUXmas have been publishing their Advent Calendar for UX folk since 2012. I am very impressed that they already have their call for submissions for 2019 up and running. So, you can read some useful aticles this year and submit your idea for next year at the same time.

@merryuxmas on Twitter

24 Accessibility

24 Accessibility24 Accessibility are back for a second year of accessibility posts in the run-up to Christmas. The project was started by Dennis Deacon, an Accessibility Engineer with The Paciello Group, and will be well worth following this year.

RSS Feed
@24accessibility on Twitter

Fronteers Advent Calendar

Fronteers Advent CalendarFronteers are running 24 posts in Dutch on their blog. A lovely touch is that each writer chooses a charity, and the Fronteers organization will donate 75 euros on their behalf.

RSS Feed
@Fronteers on Twitter

Advent Of Code

Advent Of CodeIf you would prefer a puzzle over an article, take a look at Advent of Code. Created by Eric Wastl, this is an Advent calendar of small programming puzzles for a variety of skill sets and skill levels that can be solved in any programming language you like.

@ericwastl on Twitter

24 Days In Umbraco

24 Days In Umbraco24 Days In Umbraco is a calendar of articles relating to the Umbraco CMS. They have been publishing every December since 2012. Their About page says that the calendar started when:

“… we asked a bunch of Umbraco people if they had a favorite feature, a story or something else that they’d be willing to write a short article about. Then we’d post a new one here every day through December.”

@24daysinumbraco on Twitter

Advent Speaker Tips

Advent Speaker TipsNew this year is a daily public speaking tip on the Notist blog.

RSS Feed
@benotist on Twitter

Data-Driven Advent Calendar

Data-Driven Advent CalendarThe Data-Driven Advent Calendar will contain an article about data journalism each day of Advent. The project is from Journocode who are computer scientists and journalists working in newsrooms across Germany.

@journocode on Twitter

A Computer Of One’s Own

A Computer Of One’s OwnPosting to Medium, A Computer Of One’s Own will highlight the lives of the pioneers of the computer age. The project is by Alvaro Videla, with illustrations by Sebastian Navas.

@old_sound (Alvaro Videla) on Twitter

React, JavaScript, Security And Elm Christmas

React, JavaScript, Security And Elm ChristmasA set of calendars sponsored by Norwegian company Bekk. They are supporting React Christmas, JavaScript Christmas, Security Christmas and Elm Christmas. That’s a whole lot of articles to curate!

#devAdvent

Not a website but instead a hashtag: Sarah Drasner tweeted that she would be highlighting a person and project every day of Advent using the hastag #devAdvent. Follow along to get to know some new folks and the work they do.

@sarah_edo on Twitter
#devAdvent

Tomorrow I’m gonna start a dev advent calendar. Every day from the 1st to the 25th, I’ll highlight a new person and a project of theirs that I’m into and think people would benefit from knowing about. ❤️

— Sarah Drasner (@sarah_edo) November 30, 2018

Share The Ones I Missed!

If you know of a calendar related to web design and development that I haven’t mentioned here, post a comment. Enjoy your seasonal reading!

Smashing Editorial
(il)

Typography: Soulcraft a typeface to encourage all of us

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/abduzeedo/~3/mn0L-lZlwCI/typography-soulcraft-typeface-encourage-all-us

Typography: Soulcraft a typeface to encourage all of us

Typography: Soulcraft a typeface to encourage all of us

abduzeedo
Dec 04, 2018

Soulcraft typeface is a free OpenType variable font designed with the idea of emulating vernacular lettering. This beautiful typography project was created and shared by Massimo Studio, Erick Donate, Jean Wojciechowski and Marcelo de Costa. Since the font is an OTVar font, the user is able to change width and slant of each individual character without relying on pre-defined font weights. This enables to replicate some quirky characteristics found in the drawing of sans-serif letters in street signs and walls, giving an energetic, unapologetic and dynamic feeling to the compositions made with the font.

Our goal was to create a typeface to encourage all of us. Soulcraft is available to everyone for free, empowering creative people to make use of it in the most varied ways to express themselves in a bold, raw and unafraid voice. By being variable, the font gives the possibility to do so many different kinds of work with a single file. It’s like having a toolbox in just one type.

Typography

Share your work using Soulcraft Typeface tagging @massimo.studio on social media 

Download Soulcraft Typeface here

Typography


In Review: The Mighty Hasselblad X1D

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/abduzeedo/~3/4_buAgyZv9E/review-mighty-hasselblad-x1d

In Review: The Mighty Hasselblad X1D

In Review: The Mighty Hasselblad X1D

abduzeedo
Dec 03, 2018

Before I start anything I just want to get things straight, I am not a professional photographer, although I studied photography and have developed quite a few photographs in a darkroom. By all means, I would describe myself as an enthusiast and through that lens, I want to share my thoughts about my time with the incredible Hasselblad X1D.

The great people at Hasselblad sent us the X1D for a few weeks so we could play with this marvelous piece of equipment. Francois already wrote a very in-depth look at the camera that you should definitely check out. Now it’s my turn to share my experience with it.

To get started, let’s touch on a few of the technical aspects. The X1D is a medium format camera. For those who are not familiar with the term, it’s related to the size of the sensor as there are different sensor sizes. There are very small ones like the ones of phones, there are 1inch sensors, there is the popular micro 4/3 that was adopted by Panasonic and Olympus with super fast auto-focus cameras, then there’s the ASCP, like the Sony A6000 cameras, Full Frame which is the standard and where you can get a real translation of focus-lens with no crop. For example, a 35mm lens has no crop with a Full Frame camera. There’s a good article about this topic at DPReview they explain much better than I do.

The Hasselblad X1D has a bigger sensor than a Full Frame camera. That means, it captures a lot more light. The result is quite stupendous but it also has some downsides. The biggest one for me when using the X1D was that sometimes the camera was a bit too slow, creating some blurred images, especially if you are capturing a moving object. I was taking a bunch of photos of my son. However, the photos that were correctly taken were simply amazing.

The level of details you can capture with a camera like this is just amazing and hard to explain in words. As an owner of the Sony XR1 M2, which is a full frame with a great sensor, I never thought the results would be exponentially better, however, they were. The low light capacity of the X1D is insane. Having a tripod makes it even better.

Now let’s talk about Industrial Design, an area that I am more familiar than photography. The Hasselblad shines even more here. I was amazed by the build quality. It makes my Sony feel like a toy. The X1D has a very minimal design, with an aluminum body, a decent size touchscreen and the manual controls easily accessible. The camera has this classic look with the yellow button for the shutter that seems to be a trademark from Hasselblad. It’s also funny because for the first time I felt I had all the attention for any camera aficionado. I took the camera to a parade where I saw some people with Leica Ms, but I could see them looking at me carrying the X1D with an eye of envy. One photographer came to talk to me about it. That was the proof of how mythical this camera is.

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Another great industrial design feature is the battery mechanism, very smart. There’s just a hole where the battery goes, and the battery closes it. Not lids or weird latches. Very smart. The interface design for the screen is also a testament of simplicity and modernist look. Everything is easily accessible with swipes. There aren’t thousands of commands like the Sony. Things are just super straightforward. To connect to the WiFi is simply a toggle on/off. Everything in the UI is in beautiful black and white with big fonts. In addition that the camera has a USB C port, 2 slots of batteries, HDMI port, and microphone port.

I used the camera for a couple of days, just for photography. I had just one lens with it, it was a 45mm lens and it was quite sharp. I went to a few places carrying the X1D with me. It’s not a massive camera, but it feels super solid and because of that, it is not a light camera. Depending on the lens you use it can get even heavier, but nothing that a nice camera bag can’t solve.

I won’t get into technical photography details because I am not the best at it, but I want to wrap this up by saying that if you ever have the opportunity to experience a Hasselblad X1D you should. It opens up your horizon about photography in general. It makes you appreciate the differences in sensor size, lenses, controls. It also carries this legacy that definitely catches eyeballs everywhere you go. The most important thing though is the photos produced. With a sensor of that size, it renders marvelous images. The dynamic range is quite amazing and the sharpness, in my opinion, is incredible. I wish I had more time to dive deep into different photo subjects, maybe next time. Until then I will keep the memories of the days I had the opportunity to spend with this classic camera. I’ll share my parting thought that the best camera is the one you have with you at the moment, however, if you have the X1D with you that would be better.

Thanks again to the great folks at Hasselblad for allowing us to play with the camera and if you want in-depth reviews from photographers to make sure to check out the links below.

Photos

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Pay What You Want for the Master Game Development Bundle

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Designrfix/~3/C-fRhDHUCwk/pay-what-you-want-master-game-development-bundle

Gaming is a billion dollar industry and has been for years. If you are a gamer, you have probably thought of getting into game development before. As the video gaming market continues to grow, so does the demand for game developers. You need to have the broadest skill set possible to get one of those […]

The post Pay What You Want for the Master Game Development Bundle appeared first on designrfix.com.

10 of the best creative resumés

Original Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/CreativeBloq/~3/mrkOVZWjrh4/creative-resumes-11121419

We all know finding work in the design industry is an extremely competitive process, even if you do have a killer design portfolio. With so many talented people around, just getting noticed is a job in itself. 

Designers and illustrators around the world have long been coming up with unusual creative strategies to give their resumés an edge in the hunt for employment. If you're in need of inspiration for your own CV, here are some of the best creative resumés out there to help get the creative juices flowing.

01. Victor Rodriguez

Victor Rodriguez cereal box themed resume

This cereal-themed resume is high in fibre and work history details

Colombian art director and designer Victor Rodriguez, also known as Vimarovi, has an appreciation for lots of different aspects of graphic design, including corporate identity, packaging and product design. So what better way to showcase all these interests than with a resume that brings together all these elements?

That's just what Rodriguez has done with the innovative VICK cereal box. Designed to look like an everyday cereal box, this CV humorously weaves his work history and creative skills into the design. Instead of ingredients, hungry clients will find information about his personality, strengths and previous employment, and if anyone needed any proof of Rodriguez's claims, the packaging speaks for itself.

02. Andy Morris

Andy Morris creative resume

Andy Morris thought small when it came to his new CV

Art director, artist and designer Andy Morris caught the design industry's attention for all the right reasons with this fantastically creative resume. Rather than sticking with the traditional paper, Morris commissioned a LEGO minifigure in his own likeness, complete with a tiny laptop in one hand and a mini-CV in the other. To update prospective clients with the information they need, the packaging features a bitesized run-down of Morris' skills, plus contact details.

03. Pierre-Marie Postel

Click the image to see the full CV

Graphic designer and illustrator Pierre-Marie Postel – also known as Paiheme – decided to use his CV to show off exactly what he's best at. His creative resume displays his impressive illustration style, and mimics a Japanese print advert. 

It's not style at the expense of substance, however – this CV includes plenty of key information, plus some quirky additions such as character designs to show off Postel's personality. The monochrome colour palette ensures it doesn't become overwhelming.

04. Brennan Gleason

creative resume

Brennan Gleason decided to combine two passions

Interaction designer Brennan Gleason was nearing the end of university and needed to get his name known by potential employers. To do so in style he brewed up a batch of blonde ale, packaged it up in a neat cardboard carrier, and printed his CV on the back. The idea being that prospective employers could sit down for a quick drink and peruse Gleason's design skills at the same time.

05. Curriculum 3D

Benjamin Benhaim’s 3D CV really stands out

Inspired by this great-looking flat CV from Jimmy Raheriarisoa, Paris-based art director and motion designer Benjamin Benhaim set to work and made this stunning 3D rendered resumé. Created using Cinema 4D, Octane and After Effects, it covers all the bases and features plenty of playful touches, and each image took around seven minutes to render. Time well spent!

06. Robynne Redgrave

creative resume

You’d be all over this if it turned up in the post

This portfolio mail package created by Robynne Redgrave, a Canadian graphic designer based in Helsinki, is a real attention-grabber. It contains not only her CV but a whole load of stuff including a hand-bound portfolio book, a letter of intent, application form and certificates.

07. Robby Leonardi

robby leonardi creative resume

Robby Leonardi’s interactive CV caused a real stir when he launched it

Robby Leonardi is a multidisciplinary designer based in New York City. Specialising in illustration, graphic design, animation, and front end development, he has worked with the likes of Fox, Speed TV, FX Networks, myNetworkTV and G4. His incredibly fun interactive design resumé will have you scrolling for hours!

08. Julia Miceli

Julia Miceli’s CV is testament that creativity can also be practical

Julia Miceli – a graphic designer based in Buenos Aires, Argentina – managed to hit all the right notes with her creative resume. It's simple compared to many of the other in this list, but still oozes personality. The bold orange colour is unusual and eye-catching, and there isn't an element that hasn't been carefully art directed. 

Miceli has also considered practical aspects: the CV is a standard A4 size, but sits in a wallet that shows it off to its full potential, and there's a neat slot that holds a business card the viewer can pop out and keep. 

09. Zhi Liang

A simple and inventive approach to the résumé design

Singapore-based student Chen Zhi Liang was set a task by his graphic design tutor to create an inventive résumé that would make him stand out from the crowd. The semester-end assignment was to create an infographic résumé and we think he's come up trumps with this design.

Showcasing the all-important qualifications and skills, the résumé is eye-catching without being overwhelming. Liang's minimal approach is perfect for an overcrowded job market. We'd definitely hire him!

10. Ed Hamilton

creative resume

Ed Hamilton’s Google Map resumé uses personalised placemarkers to highlight his skills

When London-based copywriter Ed Hamilton was out of work, he decided to put his time to good use and develop a creative way to stand out to prospective employers.

Using Google Maps' My Maps feature, Hamilton mapped his resumé, using different coloured pins to create personalised placemarkers, each accompanied by explanatory text. The brilliant design includes pins for where Hamilton lives, his interests and his previous employment.

Related articles:

20 tips for design interview successHow to be the designer every agency wants to hire14 free resume templates